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Geological Association of Canada


Geological Association of Canada

Mineralogical Association of Canada

 

ANNUAL MEETING GUIDE FOR ORGANIZERS



COMPILED BY THE GAC® AND MAC PROGRAM COMMITTEES

APPROVED BY GAC® AND MAC COUNCILS

 



 

PREFACE

 

The premier annual geoscience conference in Canada over the last 30 years has been organized by the Geological Association of Canada (GAC®), in concert with the Mineralogical Association of Canada (MAC). The conferences, which typically are termed the Annual Meeting because they are usually the setting of the annual business meetings of the associations, have been very successful, almost completely because of the hard work and commitment of the Local Organizing Committee (LOC). The associations are sincerely appreciative of the work of the LOC, and this Annual Meeting Guide for Organizers considers this by distilling past experience, laying ground rules for the future, and illustrating essential procedures and problem areas. An important development is that GAC®-MAC conferences in the future are likely to be organized in cooperation with other organizations, and so it is important that the expectations, policies and procedures of all parties are considered.

The first “preliminary” version of the GAC® Annual Meeting booklet was produced in 1973.  Since then, various GAC®/MAC Joint Technical Program Committees, GAC® Program Committees, and Executive Committees of the two organizations have produced a number of revisions to the “Annual Meeting Guide” the latest being in 1998. The rapid increase in the use of computer presentations, and e-communication and business has significantly changed the organization of the Annual Meetings, and this most recent update (Spring 2005) attempts to clarify these changes.

This Guide should be used in conjunction with Annual Meeting Final Reports (and their useful tips) of the past two or three years. The Guide is available to organizers in the form of a loose leaf binder to permit easy modification as new information becomes available or as policies change, or as an electronic file downloadable from the GAC® website. A password must be obtained from the GAC® Head Office. 

It is the responsibility of the Science Program Committee of the GAC® to take the lead in updating the Annual Meeting Guide on a regular basis, and preferably annually.  The updated version of the Guide should be ratified at the annual October council meetings of GAC® and MAC and should address the recommended changes included in the final report of the LOC of the previous Annual Meetings, if they are useful and appropriate.

 

 

Revised version May 1998

REVISED Summer 2006

 



THE GOAL OF THE ANNUAL MEETING

 

The Mission Statement

 

By means of the Annual joint meeting, the GAC® and the MAC aim to achieve the following goals:

 

-     to facilitate communication with members, colleagues, and with the public;

 

-     to provide our members with enhanced opportunities to learn of developments in our science;

 

-     to formally recognize the scientific achievements of our colleagues;

 

-     to plan and develop future scientific and professional projects and policies;

 

-     to provide a safe environment for all participants, particularly those on associated field trips.

 

The vehicles by which the above goals are to be achieved include technical talks, poster displays, field trips, short courses and workshops.

 

 

Guidelines and Suggestions for LOCs

 

LOCs look to the policies laid out in the Annual Meeting Guide for Organizers, and to the GAC® and MAC Science Program Committees for guidance in the design and implementation of annual meetings.

 

If there are to be major experimental changes in the form or content of annual meetings, then the parent associations (GAC® & MAC) must accept the risks that might result from the conduct of any such experiments.

 

With respect to enhancing the ability of the LOC to achieve the Associations’ goals for annual meetings, Science Program committees provide the following suggestions for councils and for LOCs:

 

1.   Consider program or design changes that will increase the communication from the profession to society.

 

2.   Have regular ‘plenary’ or ‘thematic’ sessions that will increase the opportunities for registrants to become better informed about emerging ideas, technology, and topics of current interest.

 

3.   Review submitted abstracts and apply more rigorous standards for their acceptance.

 

4.   Provide session chairs with more precise directions about their duties and responsibilities; insist that they perform these duties conscientiously, that they make an effort to provide coherence to the sessions and that subsequently they provide a critical evaluation of their sessions.

 

 

5.   The Science Program Committees and Councils could take a lead in suggesting topics for themes, symposia, special sessions and short courses to the LOCs, although knowledge of the local geoscience community and environment is extremely important.

 

6.      Ensure that organization of the meeting includes consideration of safety issues, particularly when planning field trips and entertainment events.


CONTENTS

Geological Association of Canada.......................................................................................................... i

PREFACE............................................................................................................................................... i

The Mission Statement.......................................................................................................................... iii

Guidelines and Suggestions for LOCs.................................................................................................. iii

CONTENTS........................................................................................................................................... v

LIST OF APPENDICES (available from GAC® Website)....................................................................... ix

INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................... 1

THE GAC® NATIONAL ORGANIZATION................................................................................................. 1

General Structure....................................................................................................................... 1

Committees............................................................................................................................... 2

Publications................................................................................................................................ 2

Other Publications..................................................................................................................... 2

THE MAC NATIONAL ORGANIZATION................................................................................................. 3

General Structure....................................................................................................................... 3

Committees............................................................................................................................... 3

Publications................................................................................................................................ 3

GAC®-MAC POLICY PRINCIPLES REGARDING ANNUAL MEETINGS................................................ 4

Preamble.................................................................................................................................... 4

Designating the General Chair and Vice-Chair.......................................................................... 4

Accountability to Parent Councils.............................................................................................. 4

Fiscal Responsibility.................................................................................................................. 5

The Sharing of Surpluses.......................................................................................................... 5

RELATIONSHIPS WITH GAC®: COMMUNICATIONS AND SERVICES AVAILABLE............................. 7

RELATIONSHIPS WITH GAC®: COMMUNICATIONS AND SERVICES AVAILABLE............................. 7

General....................................................................................................................................... 7

Divisions and Sections.............................................................................................................. 7

Committees............................................................................................................................... 7

GAC® Head Office....................................................................................................................... 7

Technical Support...................................................................................................................... 8

Cost of the Services.................................................................................................................. 8

Changes to the Services........................................................................................................... 8

RELATIONSHIPS WITH MAC:  COMMUNICATIONS AND SERVICES AVAILABLE............................ 9

General....................................................................................................................................... 9

Short Courses............................................................................................................................ 9

MAC Contacts............................................................................................................................ 9

OVERVIEW:  COUNTDOWN TO THE ANNUAL MEETING............................................................... 11

THE WORK OF THE LOC:  GETTING STARTED............................................................................. 16

Structure and Meetings............................................................................................................ 16

Setting the Date....................................................................................................................... 16

Logo and Stationery................................................................................................................. 16

Website.................................................................................................................................... 16

FINANCES........................................................................................................................................... 17

Preamble.................................................................................................................................. 17

Initial Budgeting and Fund-raising............................................................................................ 17

Handling Funds Before the Meeting......................................................................................... 18

G.S.T........................................................................................................................................ 19

Handling Funds During the Meeting......................................................................................... 19

Using Plastic............................................................................................................................ 19

Disbursements After the Meeting............................................................................................ 19

COMMUNICATIONS (Website, Notices,  Abstract Volume)............................................................... 20

Preamble.................................................................................................................................. 20

French Translation................................................................................................................... 20

Website.................................................................................................................................... 20

The First Notice........................................................................................................................ 21

The Second Notice.................................................................................................................. 21

The Final Notice....................................................................................................................... 21

Program and Abstract Volumes.............................................................................................. 21

THE TECHNICAL PROGRAM............................................................................................................. 24

General..................................................................................................................................... 24

Symposia................................................................................................................................. 24

Special Sessions..................................................................................................................... 25

Public Awareness of Earth Sciences...................................................................................... 25

Quality Control......................................................................................................................... 26

Session Chairs........................................................................................................................ 26

Technical Services.................................................................................................................. 27

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT.......................................................... 28

Responsibilities:....................................................................................................................... 28

Critical Time-Lines:.................................................................................................................. 28

The Second Notice – Call for Abstracts.................................................................................. 28

Abstract Submission................................................................................................................ 28

Potential Abstract Submission Problems................................................................................ 29

Acknowledging the Abstract..................................................................................................... 29

Review and Acceptance Procedures – The Abstract Review and Program Development Web Site           29

Program Development............................................................................................................. 30

The Online Program and Searchable Abstract Database....................................................... 30

Editing Abstracts...................................................................................................................... 30

Development of the Program and Abstract Volumes.............................................................. 30

Late Withdrawals..................................................................................................................... 31

REGISTRATION.................................................................................................................................. 32

E-commerce Banking Links.................................................................................................... 32

Taxes and the Canada Customs and Revenue Business Number........................................ 33

The Final Notice....................................................................................................................... 33

Accommodation....................................................................................................................... 33

Exhibitor Registration............................................................................................................... 33

Setting Fees............................................................................................................................. 34

On-Line Registration Procedures............................................................................................ 34

Acknowledgement of Registration........................................................................................... 35

Registration Problems............................................................................................................. 35

Fax- or Mail-in Registrations.................................................................................................... 35

Separate Registration for Short Courses, Workshops and Field Trips.................................. 35

Complimentary Registrations and Events............................................................................... 35

Additional Purchases, Cancellations and Refunds................................................................. 35

Cancellations by the LOC........................................................................................................ 35

Reviewing the Registration Database via the Web................................................................. 36

The Registration Area.............................................................................................................. 36

Policy Decisions...................................................................................................................... 38

Exhibitor Registration............................................................................................................... 38

Name Badges, Receipts and Tickets...................................................................................... 38

Accounting and Audit Procedures........................................................................................... 39

The University-Centred Meeting............................................................................................... 39

The Hotel or Convention Centre  Meeting................................................................................ 39

TRANSPORTATION............................................................................................................................ 41

EXHIBITS............................................................................................................................................. 41

General..................................................................................................................................... 41

Exhibitor Information and kit..................................................................................................... 42

List of Exhibitors....................................................................................................................... 42

FIELD TRIPS....................................................................................................................................... 43

Policy Guidelines...................................................................................................................... 43

Field Trip Budgets.................................................................................................................... 43

Final Arrangements.................................................................................................................. 44

Cancellation of Field Trips and Refunds.................................................................................. 44

Field Trip Guidebooks.............................................................................................................. 45

ACCOMPANYING MEMBERS PROGRAM......................................................................................... 46

SPECIAL EVENTS.............................................................................................................................. 47

General..................................................................................................................................... 47

Luncheons............................................................................................................................... 47

Presidential Addresses............................................................................................................ 47

President’s Reception.............................................................................................................. 47

Other Events............................................................................................................................ 48

Logan Paintings....................................................................................................................... 48

PUBLICITY........................................................................................................................................... 48

BUSINESS MEETINGS....................................................................................................................... 49

SHORT COURSES and WORKSHOPS............................................................................................ 50

Responsibilities........................................................................................................................ 50

Definitions................................................................................................................................ 50

Appendix 1A.  Abstract Receipt Notification Letter.............................................................................. 51

Appendix 1B.  Abstract Review........................................................................................................... 52

Review Procedures................................................................................................................. 55

Changing a Session Assignment or Presentation Mode......................................................... 57

Appendix 1C.  Preparing the Program................................................................................................. 59

Appendix 1D.  Acknowledging Abstract Acceptance and Place in Program...................................... 61

Appendix 1E.  Development of the Online Program-at-a-Glance and Searchable Abstract Database 62

Editing Abstracts...................................................................................................................... 63

Searching the Abstract Database............................................................................................ 65

Appendix 1F.  Preparation of the Abstract Volume.............................................................................. 67

Formatted Files........................................................................................................................ 68

Appendix 2A.  Required entry fields for registration forms (printed and downloadable)..................... 69

Appendix 2B.  Sample Exhibitor Information and Registration Form (from St. John’s 2001)............. 71

Appendix 2C.  Acknowledging Receipt of Registrations..................................................................... 73

Appendix 2D.  Searching, Reviewing and Editing Registration data via the Web Facility.................. 74

Appendix 2E.  The Standard Conference Name Badge and Receipt................................................. 76

Appendix 2F  Suggested simplified on-site registration form.............................................................. 77

Appendix 3 Guidelines for GAC® Short Courses................................................................................... 79

General..................................................................................................................................... 79

Responsibilities........................................................................................................................ 80

Financial................................................................................................................................... 82

Planning and Deadlines........................................................................................................... 83

Publications.............................................................................................................................. 84

Appendix 4 Guidelines for MAC Short Courses................................................................................... 87

Introduction............................................................................................................................... 87

Who’s Who?  Roles and responsibilities to make an MAC Short Course happen................. 87

Procedure and Timelines......................................................................................................... 90

Short Course Volume.............................................................................................................. 91

Subsidies and Registration policy............................................................................................ 91

Budget...................................................................................................................................... 91

 

 


LIST OF APPENDICES (available from GAC® Website)

(provided as PDF Files)

Appendix 5 .... Guidelines Jéröme Remick Poster Awards

 

Appendix 6      GAC®/MAC Field Trip Safety Policy     

 

Appendix 7.     Geological Association of Canada Directory

                       

Appendix 8.     Annual Meetings Statistics: Program breakdown.

                        (A8Annual meeting registrations.pdf)

 

Appendix 9.     Annual Meetings Statistics: Registration fees.

                        (A9Meeting registrations.pdf).

 

Appendix 10.   Annual Meetings Statistics: Registration breakdown by category.

                        (A10RegistrationBreakdown.pdf).

 

Appendix 11.   Annual Meetings Statistics:  Disposition of financial surplus

                        (A11Surplus.pdf)

 

Appendix 12    Sample budget for Annual General Meeting

                        (A12 Samplemeetingbudget.pdf)

 

 


INTRODUCTION

 

For both the GAC® and the MAC, the Annual Meeting is an important event that embodies many aspects of the principal objectives of both national associations.

 

The success of the meetings  is principally due to the efforts of Local Organizing Committees (LOCs), separately structured bodies that are responsible for the actual organization and conduct of the meetings.  Centred in one community, comprising individuals who already have close professional affiliations, the LOC brings a cohesiveness and focus to the Annual Meeting that would be impossible by any other mechanism.  Although, the major and local planning initiatives must be ratified by GAC® and MAC executives and councils, the LOC is entrusted with considerable responsibility and authority for ensuring the technical, logistical, social and financial success of the meeting. 

 

 

THE GAC® NATIONAL ORGANIZATION

 

General Structure

The Geological Association of Canada was founded on March 11, 1947.  On January 24, 1984, it was incorporated under the Canada Corporations Act.  Its constitutional statutes include incorporation documents, by-laws, as well as rules and regulations.  The reader should bookmark the GAC® website (www.gac.ca) for more detailed information on the association. The Annual Meeting is vital for the GAC® in meeting its objectives.

 

The governing body of the Association is the Council, which includes the designated officers:  President, Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer, and Councillors The Executive Committee of Council consists of the President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, the immediate Past-President and the Chairpersons of the Finance, Program, Communications and Publications Committees.  The purpose of the Executive Committee is to manage the ongoing affairs of the Association within the policies and annual budgets established by Council.

 

The headquarters of the Association (HQ) is currently located at Memorial University of Newfoundland and operates under the direction of the Secretary-Treasurer and has a small staff consisting of the Finance and Administration Manager, the Publications Director and the Membership/Registration Supervisor. HQ houses the GAC® archives and its current files and records.

 

The GAC® has Sections and Divisions, which have their own statutes within the broader framework of the GAC®. The LOC should coordinate with the executives of the Sections and Divisions during the planning of the technical program for the conference.

 

Sections of GAC® serve the geoscience community at the local or regional scale in various parts of Canada.  Six sections exist at present - Cordilleran Section (Vancouver), Edmonton Geological Society, Newfoundland Section (St. John's), Pacific Section (Victoria), Winnipeg Section, and the newest, AQUEST in Quebec.

 

GAC® Divisions are discipline oriented, drawing their membership from all parts of Canada, serving the needs of selected specialist groups.  The twelve Divisions of GAC® are:  Geophysics, Canadian Sedimentology Research Group, Environmental Earth Sciences, Marine Geoscience, Precambrian, Structural Geology and Tectonics, Volcanology and Igneous Petrology, Paleontology, Mineral Deposits, Geomatics, Canadian Geomorphology Research Group and Isotope Sciences.

 

Associated societies may have members that do not belong to GAC®.  There are six affiliates at present - Atlantic Geoscience Society, Canadian Quaternary Association (CANQUA), the Toronto Geological Discussion Group, the Canadian Geophysical Union, American Geophysical Union and the Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists.

 

An up-to-date listing of divisions, sections, associated societies and their chairs or presidents appears at the front of each issue of Geolog and Geoscience Canada and at the GAC® website (www.gac.ca).

 

Committees

Many aspects of the activities of the GAC® are handled by standing committees.  At present the following standing committees are:

EXECUTIVE Committee;

AWARDS Committee, responsible for the Association Medals E.R. Ward Neale Medal, Ambrose Medal, Logan Medal, Hutchinson Medal;

COMMUNICATIONS Committee  with responsibility for the Honorary Life, Distinguished Service and Voluntary Service Awards;

FINANCE Committee which includes The Logan Student Fund, The Robinson Fund and the Jérôme H. Remick III Trust Fund, the General Fund and the Yves Fortier Fund; NOMINATING Committee;

SCIENCE PROGRAM Committee including the GAC®-MAC Annual Meeting Guide, GAC®-MAC Joint Program Committee, Annual Meeting Locations, Nuna Conference Guidelines, Field Conference Guidelines and Short Course and Short Course Procedures; and the, PUBLICATIONS Committee.  All committees are accountable to Council.

 

The duties of the various committees, implied by their titles, are detailed in the GAC® Rules and Regulations and in approved Terms of Reference documents.  Committee activities are summarized annually in the Secretary-Treasurer's Report published in Geolog.

 

Publications

The Geological Association of Canada produces several categories of publications. In addition to the quarterly journal “Geoscience Canada”, the quarterly newsmagazine “Geolog”, is provided to all members. There are peer-reviewed publications known as “Special Papers”, “Geoscience Canada Reprint Series” and “GEOtext”. GAC® also publishes NUNA Conference volumes and “Short Course Notes”. A style guide for editors and contributors of GAC® Publications is available from the GAC® Headquarters office. Publications are sold through the on-line bookstore maintained by Headquarters. Publications of GAC® Sections and Divisions, as well as independent publishers are available through the on-line bookstore.

 

Contributors should note that all professionals associated with GAC® Publications are volunteers, including the GAC® Book Editor, with the exceptions of Special Paper copy editors and production editors who work on publication-specific contracts, and a Publications Director, who handles publications and their distribution from GAC® Headquarters

 

Other Publications

The “Program and Abstracts” is a joint publication of the Geological Association of Canada and the Mineralogical Association of Canada produced for the Joint Annual Meeting of the two societies. In some years , a CD version of the abstracts has been produced and no paper copy, in others no CD or paper copy and the abstracts exist only on the GAC® website. Regardless of the method chosen for any meeting the official version of the abstract volume is archived on the GAC® website.. Field trip guidebooks are the responsibility of the Organizing Committee of the Joint Annual Meeting, They are sold during the meeting and are available after the Annual Meeting from the Organizing Committee.

 

 


THE MAC NATIONAL ORGANIZATION

 

General Structure

The Mineralogical Association of Canada was founded on August 5, 1955, and is incorporated under Section 133 of the Canada Corporation Act.  The Association is governed by statutes and by-laws, which may be obtained by writing the Secretary of the Association, whose name and address are given on the inside back cover of every issue of The Canadian Mineralogist, the official scientific journal of the Association.  The Association consists of members who may be any person, corporate body, or institution interested or engaged in the study or use of crystallography, geochemistry, mineralogy, petrology, mineral deposits or an allied science.

 

The Association is governed by a Council, consisting of the President, the Vice-President, the Secretary, the Treasurer, the Past-President, the Subscription Manager, the Editor, the Chair of the Finance Committee, and nine Councillors.  The Editor, Finance Chair, and Subscription Manager are appointed by Council and do not vote, whereas the others are elected by the members, and exercise a vote.  The Council meets at least twice each year, once at the annual GAC®-MAC meeting, and once in the fall in the city where the next Annual GAC®-MAC meeting will take place.

 

In addition to the members of Council, other officers are appointed from time to time to carry out various functions.  At present, these include the Short Course Coordinator, the Chair of the Membership Committee, the Newsletter Editor, the Book Review Editor and the Foreign Secretary.

 

Committees

The activities of the Association are conducted and coordinated by a number of standing and ad hoc committees, which include the Finance Committee, the Membership Committee, the Publicity Committee, the Nominating Committee, Committees for the Hawley Award, the Past Presidents' Medal, the Berry Medal, and the Program Committee, which is chaired by the Vice-President of the Association.

 


Publications

The Canadian Mineralogist is the official organ of the MAC.  It is published quarterly, in March, June, September and December, and mailed to each member.  The journal has a policy of printing only rigorously refereed scientific research, and has extremely wide circulation and readership.  Under special circumstances and by special arrangement, the journal may agree to publish complete symposia, collections of special papers, or extended abstracts of original work deriving from sessions at the GAC®-MAC Annual Meeting.  Proposals for such publications are normally made by the organizer of the symposium or special session to the Editor of The Canadian Mineralogist, and are subject to approval by MAC Council.  In addition to these, the MAC publishes the series 'Short Course Handbooks', which are made up of the lectures given in the annual MAC Short Courses offered at most of the GAC®-MAC Annual Meetings.  The MAC also publishes a Newsletter, which is sent to members twice each year.  Information about upcoming Annual Meetings is often included in the Newsletter, and LOCs are encouraged to submit meeting announcements directly to the Newsletter Editor.


GAC®-MAC POLICY PRINCIPLES REGARDING ANNUAL MEETINGS

 

Preamble

This Guide sets out many ideas and suggestions to help Local Organizing Committees structure and discharge their tasks.  These are guidelines (to assist the LOC in planning and carrying out a successful meeting) and are not intended as rigid rules to be obeyed in all instances.  Indeed, the LOC has very considerable discretion with regards to many aspects of the Annual Meeting.  There are, however, a number of important policy principles on which the parent associations insist.

 

Designating the General Chair and Vice-Chair

When a local committee of earth scientists is approached and agrees to run a given Annual Meeting, typically four to five years in advance, the first official action of the GAC® and MAC is to designate a General Chair and a Vice-Chair for the Local Organizing Committee.  Typically, the General Chairperson shall act as representative of the GAC® and the Vice-Chairperson shall act as representative of the MAC. However, the GAC® and MAC Councils are flexible and the choice of Chair and Vice-Chair could depend on the expertise and interest level of the individuals, as well as the involvement of other associations in the conference. The GAC® Council must ratify the choice of General Chair/GAC® representative at a Council meeting.  If other organizations are formally involved in the conference, then one member of the LOC should be designated the representative of that organization. The selection of other members of the LOC, each of which typically accepts responsibility for some aspect of the meeting's organization, rests in the hands of the General Chairperson and the Vice-Chairperson.

 

Accountability to Parent Councils

Both associations have an abiding interest in the progress being made for each annual meeting.  Through the distribution of minutes and other communications, the parent organizations keep the General Chair and the Vice-Chair and representatives of other associations fully informed of all deliberations and decisions that have implications for the conduct of the Annual meeting.  Conversely, it is expected that the General Chair and the Vice-Chair prepare and present joint reports of progress to successive meetings of the two Councils, either in writing or verbally

 

Minutes of LOC meetings should be kept by a designated member of the LOC, and sent to the appropriate contact person in each association (e.g. Science Program Committee Chair in the GAC®) for distribution. In order for GAC® and MAC to be properly accountable to their respective memberships, it is necessary that the councils of both the GAC® and MAC retain the right to ratify and/or amend any decisions of substance that may be passed by the Organizing Committee.  This provision, onerous though it may sound, has not so far resulted in any irreconcilable differences of opinion.  Discussion amongst the parties always has been and will continue to be based on a spirit of trust and cooperation.

 

In order to facilitate detailed review by the GAC® Council of the progress being made by individual LOCs, to allow firsthand inspection of facilities, and, most importantly, to allow members of Council and the LOC to get to know one another, GAC® traditionally conducts its Council meetings in the city of the Annual Meeting 15 months and 6 months in advance of the meeting.  However, since 2003, GAC® and MAC have found it more useful for a smaller group of appropriate councillors to visit the LOC, and discuss elements of the meeting over a period of a day. This will likely continue in the future.

 

The LOC, of course, has a duty to submit to the associations a final report on the meeting after it has been held.  As shown later, this reviews the experiences of the meeting, its participation, social events, financial outcome and so forth.  This final report should be submitted as soon as possible and preferably within six months of the end of the Annual Meeting. This will allow the recommendations and general advice from a LOC to be utilized by the subsequent year's LOCs.

 

 

Summary of Accountability

1.         GAC® and MAC Councils have the responsibility of keeping the Chair and Vice-Chair of the LOC fully informed of Council actions that may affect the meeting.

2.         Chair and Vice-Chair of the LOC are required to present written reports of progress to each successive meeting of both Councils starting from the date of organization of their LOC, and ending with the final report after the meeting.

3.         Minutes of the meetings of the LOC are to be sent to the Science Program Committee Chair of all Associations, as well as GAC® HQ, involved in the conference for distribution.

4.         GAC® Council and MAC Council reserve the right to ratify and/or amend any decisions of substance taken by the LOC.

5.         The LOC must submit a Final Report on the meeting as soon as possible, and preferably  within six months of the close of the meeting, giving details on experiences, participation, social events, finances, and any other important matters.

 

 

Fiscal Responsibility

In order for both associations to exercise appropriate fiscal responsibility for their members, it is necessary that the Annual Meeting budget be struck in such a way as to protect against possible loss and to provide, a surplus to be used in furthering the works of the parent bodies.  In addition, surpluses are required as a contingency against the possibility of a financially disastrous meeting (due to a national air strike, for instance) must be built up over a period of years.

 

The expectation is that the Annual Meeting will realize a profit, which will allow the associations to provide benefits to members in the subsequent years. This is the practice followed by most large scientific societies.  AGU, AAPG, CSPG, GSA and SEPM generally record significant financial surpluses from their major conferences.

 

It is thus the policy of the sponsoring associations that the overall budget of the Annual Meeting should be struck so as to break even on the basis of realizing 70 percent of the conservative best estimate of attendance.

 

In all matters associated with the preparation of the Annual Meeting budget, the LOC should be in close contact with the Program Committees of the parent associations

 

The Sharing of Surpluses

After all expenses have been paid, the books for a given Annual Meeting are closed, normally within six months of the meeting.  In the event of a loss being incurred, responsibility rests with the parent associations. Following the Annual Meeting, the LOC Finance Chair arranges for an accountant to audit the income and expenses that have gone through the LOC bank account. When completed the audited statement is sent to GAC® HQ who then arranges for an audit of the income and expenses that flow through the registration side of the annual meeting. The GAC® Auditor includes information from the LOC audit and creates one audited statement including the breakdown of any profit or loss to be distributed among the sponsoring societies.

 

In instances where additional co-sponsorship of the Annual Meeting is involved, appropriate financial arrangements are negotiated well in advance. The LOC may be involved in soliciting interest from various geoscience associations with respect to co-sponsorship of Annual Meetings, although the development of an agreement between the associations with respect to expectations, responsibilities, and sharing of surpluses is the responsibility of the councils of the associations.

 

Net surpluses from a given meeting are shared according to these negotiations between the host organizations, but in all cases, the Organizing Committee will receive 20% of the conference surplus, after completion of the Final Report, and on receipt of an acceptable proposal, to all sponsoring societies, for promoting the earth sciences in the community. The subdivision of the surplus between the host organizations for recent conferences is summarized in Appendix 5.  Typically the conference surplus has been divided three parts to the GAC® and one part to the MAC.  20% of the surplus is returned to the LOC after receipt of an acceptable proposal.

 

In addition, the LOC or designated group, retains all copies of field guidebooks after the conference. Any money obtained through guidebook sales after the conference is retained by the LOC or designated group, and is not part of the conference revenue.

 

Additional Meeting Sponsors

In the case where the LOC wishes to partner with additional sponsors , e.g. CSPG, CGU, CSEG, etc., the LOC is free to discuss co-sponsorship, however the final agreement regarding the roles and responsibilities and financial commitments of each sponsor is the responsibility of GAC® and MAC councils.

 

 
RELATIONSHIPS WITH GAC®: COMMUNICATIONS AND SERVICES AVAILABLE

 

General

It is customary to briefly review progress on upcoming Annual Meetings at each of the three GAC® Council meetings held per year (usually in February, May and October).  Council minutes with decisions affecting upcoming annual meetings are circulated to the Chairpersons and Vice-Chairpersons of upcoming meetings, and minutes of LOC meetings should be sent to GAC® and MAC offices.  The list of contacts at GAC® Head Office or on Council for any given year can be found at www.gac.ca. This list is updated annually.

 

Divisions and Sections

GAC® Divisions should be contacted at least two years prior to the meeting to determine whether they wish to hold symposia or special sessions, or alternatively, to advise on, or help with, sessions that the LOC may have decided upon, but which fall into one or more of the discipline areas of the Divisions.  Obviously no LOC is likely to be able to, or to want to, provide a time slot for every one of the Divisions. Some Divisions may also wish to organize informal meetings, business meetings, short courses or workshops at Annual Meetings, and should be given the opportunity to do so.  However,  ensure that these meetings are not scheduled in conflict with the Annual General Meeting.  GAC® Sections are less likely to be interested in Annual Meeting planning, especially those located at some distance from the site involved, but the courtesy of inviting them to contribute is normally extended.

 

Committees

Many of the GAC® Committees need to be involved in Annual Meetings, and should be contacted for help.  For example, one of the most useful and lasting products of Annual Meetings are the publications that issue from the proceedings (especially Special Papers and Short Course Notes).  Advice on suitability for publication of symposia or special sessions, on format, scheduling, printing, costs, etc. falls within the domain of the Publications Committee.  This group will need to be informed as early as possible in Annual Meeting planning.  The Communications Committee may wish to organize a workshop at a particular meeting or to advise local ministers of education, teachers, etc. of some general-interest aspect of the meeting.  The Finance Committee normally advises the parent body of GAC® on raising funds, investment and reinvestment of funds, securities, and of the general financial health of the Association.  It may be able to advise on short-term investment certificates for Annual Meeting funds, a recommended procedure (see Finances).  By far the most important for local organizers is the Science Program Committee, which for purposes of the Annual Meeting meetings meets jointly with the MAC Program Committee.  The Science Program Committee can be helpful in planning practically all aspects of the Annual Meeting.  It is this committee that keeps and revises this Meeting Guide.

 

GAC® Head Office

Close liaison should be maintained from the outset with the GAC® Headquarters and especially with the Secretary-Treasurer.  The head office constantly monitors all the activities of the Association and is also in touch with many other earth science organizations in North America and abroad.  It can thus provide a 'clearing house' function or network 'switch' for LOCs.  Also, the Association's archival files on past meetings are stored at headquarters.

 

The head office can provide much assistance in publicizing the Annual Meeting.  This can be done through GAC® displays at other conferences, and with ads and notices placed in a wide range of geoscience periodicals.  All of these are coordinated by head office, and many are arranged on an exchange basis so that there is no cash outlay involved.  This publicity is especially important in attracting exhibitors to Annual Meetings.  For example, those manning a GAC® display at the annual PDAC or GSA meetings are in an excellent position to interest other exhibitors in showing their wares at the GAC®/MAC meeting.  And in the matter of identifying sources of funding, the GAC® head office may be a useful source of information.  Finally, it may be useful for the LOC early in its existence, and at selected occasions later, to meet with head office staff to explore ways in which the national GAC® can assist in planning the Annual Meeting.

 

Technical Support

GAC® HQ provides technical support to the LOC through hosting the abstract submission and registration systems (a MS Access 2000 database) that have been customized for Annual General Meeting (AGM) purposes.  This is housed on an independent GAC® server at the Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University.  The database is linked to the Internet by an OBDC connection using Active Server Pages (ASP) programming language and is accessed via the Annual Meeting Website.

The web site is displayed in French and English versions.  Any changes must, therefore, be made in both languages.  Correspondence, though, is generally in English.  GAC® HQ can provide assistance in securing French translation.

E-mail is used for rapid confirmation of receipt of abstracts and registrations and for follow-up inquiries.  The system uses both automated mass e-mails, which can be generated by a single mouse click, and individual e-mails.  Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express are the default e-mail systems.  A unique E-mail address is set up for abstract submission and registration for each meeting and acts as the main medium of contact with the Registration Office.

The database is designed so that it can be easily updated for individual meetings through look-up tables.  These contain all of the critical information needed to reconfigure an Annual Meeting.  A critical part of the system is the timed back-up.  This is a feature set up on the server that saves a daily version of the database at a set time (usually early morning).  If the database becomes corrupted or lost it can be recovered from the daily back-up files with loss of only that day’s data.  The saved files are directed to a directory set aside for this purpose.  The server is also protected by anti-hacker and virus-detection software.

The Abstract Submission and Registration web sites are maintained on the GAC® HQ server.  Near the abstract submission and registration opening dates, this site will be linked to the LOC’s web site but to conference delegates it will appear as if all transactions are taking place through the LOC site.  Test web sites are usually set up in advance of the opening dates for approval by the LOC.

Cost of the Services

The costs of the service are born entirely by the Annual Meetings.  This includes:

·    The time of the registration supervisor

·    Software/hardware maintenance and upgrades

·    Changes to the software set up

·    Travel of the registration supervisor to the annual meeting

·    Credit card charges

·    Audit of Registration finances

The LOC should contact the registration office prior to preparing their budget (i.e. at least 1 year before the meeting) for an estimate of costs.  The estimate is only that.  The full final cost for Abstract and Registration, whether less or more than the estimate, will be charged to the meeting.  Normally this will be done following the meeting, either by deduction from the registration income collected at HQ, or directly to the LOC.

Changes to the Services

Minor changes to the services are permitted in order to accommodate requirements that are unique to a specific meeting.  To be accepted, these changes must be ones that will also benefit subsequent meetings.  If accepted, the full expense will be charged to the meeting.

 

 


RELATIONSHIPS WITH MAC:  COMMUNICATIONS AND SERVICES AVAILABLE

 

General

The LOC reports its progress to MAC twice a year, at the regular meetings of the MAC Council.  This requirement to report is not difficult to meet, and rude surprises can be avoided by maintaining good liaison with the committees and individuals noted below, under Committees.  In general, the MAC usually sponsors Symposia, Special Sessions, and importantly, Short Courses.  In addition, help is offered with publicity, program organization, and seed money for the meeting as a whole and the MAC Short Course.  In addition to the scientific activities, the MAC must schedule an Executive Committee meeting, a Council meeting, a Business meeting, a Joint Program Committee meeting, the Annual MAC Luncheon, and The Canadian Mineralogist Editors Luncheon.

 

Short Courses

For many years the MAC has sponsored an annual Short Course given immediately preceeding the GAC®/MAC Annual Meeting.  These Short Courses take from one to three days, and are delivered by a selected group of invited experts as a series of lectures and sometimes demonstrations.  Each lecture is prepared in advance by its author, and the collected lectures are bound together in a volume known as the Short Course Handbook for that course.  These courses have proven very popular, and the resulting 'Handbooks' have in many cases found major use as university textbooks, and have gone through several reprintings and some revisions.

 

The process of organizing such a presentation, finding the right speakers, having the 'Handbook' off the press and in the hands of the registrants before the course starts, and, not least, dealing with the finances and the printer, is a complex task.  Over the years, the accumulated experience of successive Short Course Organizers has been distilled into a Short Course Organizer's Handbook, which is available from the MAC Short Course Coordinator or from the Secretary of the MAC.  By following the guidelines it is possible to produce an outstandingly well organized course with the minimum of headaches.  It is vital that anyone considering the presentation of a short course sponsored by MAC make early contact with the Short Course Coordinator or with the Secretary of MAC, either of whom can get the prospective organizer off on the right foot.

 

Budgeting of MAC Short Courses is predicated on a break-even operation at the Annual Meeting.  This means that all expenses connected with the Short Course must be paid out of the proceeds of registration fees, including the travel of speakers, refreshments, and the printing and binding of a suitable number of 'Handbook' volumes.  This number, for reasons of economy of printing, is usually about 1500 volumes, prepared from camera-ready copy provided by the speakers.  It is essential to begin early in getting speakers to agree to use uniformly a set of type fonts and mathematical symbols, if the volume is to maintain the high standards already set.  Further on budgeting, sales of the Short Course Handbook at the GAC®/MAC Annual Meeting are treated as part of the budget of that meeting, while post-meeting sales are the responsibility of MAC, and are carried on from the Subscription Office, presently located in Ottawa.

 

MAC Contacts

In parallel with the GAC®, the MAC offers help, guidance, and control to the LOC through certain individuals and committees.  As noted on earlier pages, the most important of these from the standpoint of the LOC are the MAC Program Committee, MAC Short Course Coordinator, the MAC Secretary, the Editor of The Canadian Mineralogist, and the Publicity Committee.

 

Summary

MAC Secretary - Normally the first person to contact when a question concerning MAC arises.  Responsible for MAC Annual Luncheon, Executive Committee Meeting, Council Meeting and Annual Business Meeting.

MAC Short Course Coordinator - Provides general direction and encouragement to local organizer of MAC Short Course.

MAC Publicity Committee Chair - Responsible for MAC Display Booth and publicity for MAC activities.

Subscription Manager - Source of mailing labels of MAC membership for various meeting circulars.

MAC Program Committee Chair - To be consulted on questions dealing with MAC contributions to technical program.

Editor of The Canadian Mineralogist - Responsible for the Editors Luncheon


OVERVIEW:  COUNTDOWN TO THE ANNUAL MEETING

 

As an introduction to the detailed review of LOC functions and responsibilities, a brief chronology of events leading up to and following the meeting is given here.  This will certainly need revision from time to time, based on suggestions and insights coming out of future Annual Meetings.  At all stages of your planning, final reports from recent Annual Meetings will be invaluable -- copies of these will be sent to you as soon as your General Chair has been appointed.  The times listed should be considered as the last possible dates by which the tasks should be accomplished.  Most LOCs have found it necessary to aim for completion sooner.

 

By 4 to 5 Years:

 

-     Proposal of site to GAC® and MAC Councils

-     Appointment of General Chair (GAC® and Vice-Chair (MAC)

-     Set date of meeting

-     Book all necessary space

-     Establish agreement with any other major co-sponsor

-     Publicize date, place and main contact for meeting through Geolog, Geotimes, Episodes, etc., so as to avoid clashes.

-     Secure WWW domain name for website

 

By 3 Years:

 

-     Appointment of local sub-committee chairs, normally including:

            ACCOMMODATION

            ACCOMPANYING MEMBERS

            EXHIBITS

            FIELD TRIPS

            FINANCE

            PRINTING/PUBLICATIONS

            PUBLICITY

            REGISTRATION

            SPECIAL EVENTS/ ENTERTAINMENT

            TECHNICAL PROGRAM

            TECHNICAL SERVICES

            TRANSPORTATION

A Recording Secretary should be appointed that would be responsible for recording minutes of LOC meetings, and distributing these minutes to the appropriate contacts in the host associations. Although all aspects of the conference are important, the success of the conference depends on its scientific vitality and fiscal responsibility, and so it is vital that all members of the LOC, and especially those responsible for the Technical Program, Field Trips, and Finance must be strongly committed. Responsibility could be assumed by individuals, or by a larger subcommittee.

 

-     At the outset, responsibility for all sub-committees should be clearly established.

-     Reach an agreement on a protocol for major decisions, some of which must be made quickly.  A smaller committee consisting of the General Chair and two or three other key sub-committee chairs (e.g. Finance, Technical Program) is suggested.

-     Invite GAC® Divisions, Sections and Committees, and MAC to 1) sponsor or advise on sessions (symposia, special sessions, short courses, workshops, field trips, and 2) suggest possible session chairs.

 

By 2 Years:

 

-     Rough plan of major sessions (symposia, special sessions, short courses, field trips) takes shape. 

-     OC sub-committee chairs set up their committees, each to include one individual responsible for finances.

-     Design logo, get approval from Councils, and choose any photographs for promotional purposes

-     Print stationery and envelopes

-     Website development begins, a basic template is available from GAC® HQ ,testing of site, and can go live at any time.

 

By 15 Months:

 

-     Finalize proposals for and set tentative schedules for symposia, special sessions, short courses, general and poster  sessions.

-     Technical Program Chair advances suggestions for publication volumes to GAC® Publications Committee or Executive Committee of MAC.

-     Confirm chairs for symposia and special sessions, informing them of their responsibilities and duties.

-     Each LOC committee compiles preliminary budgets for LOC Finance Committee, which prepares preliminary estimate of overall cost of meeting, setting proposed registration fees.

-     Field Trip Committee assembles preliminary list of trips and identifies trip leaders.  Transportation companies approached for preliminary estimate of costs.

-     Preparation of First Notice and any other publicity (poster, exhibit) to be on display at the upcoming Annual Meeting; allow plenty of time for proofreading and cross-checking before publishing.  First notice has to be available for inclusion as advertisement in any mail-outs from the host associations.

 

-     Exhibits Committee prepares specifications for exhibit space.

-     The Special Events Committee has brilliant ideas.

-          Plans and budget of LOC forwarded to GAC® and MAC Councils for comment and approval.

 

GAC® Council representatives and MAC Technical Program Committee members  meet with LOC, usually in mid-February, in the Annual Meeting city, and reviews LOC preliminary budget, venue facilities, etc.

 

 

By 1 Year:

 

-     Distribute First Notice at preceding Annual Meeting, and subsequently mail to GAC® and MAC membership. Contact GAC® and MAC HQ’s to tie in distribution of First notice to memberships, with a regular council mailing.

-     The latest time at which the website goes live, updates to website (program changes, social events, etc.) are easily made

-     Finance Chair completes LOC preliminary budget, gains estimate of possible shortfall, and submits to GAC® and MAC Executives (via head office), and (with General Chair) looks into supplementary financing.

-     Finance chair obtains estimates for abstract and registration costs from HQ then compiles breakeven estimates on spread sheets (templates are available). This helps track planning and aids seeing problems.

-     General structure of meeting approved by GAC® and MAC Councils, usually during joint meetings held at the preceding Annual Meeting.

-     Program chair obtains access to Abstract Submission site as superuser, to familiarize themselves with the function of the site and the submission process.

-     Any changes or additions to the Abstract submission site are submitted to GAC® and MAC Councils for approval at the preceding Annual Meeting.

-     Field Trips finalized, preliminary description of trip and budget are obtained from trip leaders, procedures for handling guidebook copy are devised.  All trips to be run in advance to check distances, times, stop descriptions, etc.

-     Appoint Chairs for each general technical session, informing them of their duties.

-     Exhibits Committee contacts potential exhibitors in consultation with GAC® Head office and Secretary/Treasurer.

-     General publicity releases circulated to major periodicals, especially to Geolog and MAC Newsletter.

-     OC requests 'seed money' from GAC® and MAC Executives, proposing a schedule for further advances.

-     Set up accounting and bookkeeping procedures.

-     Rough out social events and program for Accompanying Members.

 

By 9 Months:

 

-     Apply for GST Registration number from Revenue Canada -- obtain number used by previous Annual Meeting LOC and quote it when you first approach Revenue Canada.

-     Exhibits Committee to contact potential exhibitors again.

-     Technical services people confirm availability of audio-visual equipment

-     Registration Committee assembles information on painless registration procedures (consult final reports from recent Annual Meetings).

-     Technical and Local Program Chairs set up procedures for handling abstracts.

-     OC meets often enough to remind people to do what they agreed to do!

-     OC begins to assemble Second Notice and decides how to handle printing and mailing of it, and the Program and Abstract volumes; proofreading and cross-checking essential.

-     Book field trip accommodations, including residences.

-     Invite banquet speaker (if applicable).

-     Finalize plans for short courses.

-     Finalize budget revisions; fix all prices (e.g. accommodation, field trips, short courses).

 

By 8 Months*:

 

[*This deadline is set immediately before the Annual Fall Meeting of the GAC® Council]

 

-     Mail Second Notice by October 1, includes the Call for Abstracts and includes  program outline, list of field trips, short courses, highlights of social events and Accompanying Members program, etc.

-     GAC® Council and MAC Council meet with the LOC, generally in early or mid-October.  The budget, including the registration fees, will be approved at this time.

-     Have abstract submission  software in place and practise using it! Coordinate with HQ on any changes or problems.

-          Contact GAC® HQ if field trip transportation, other than vehicles and/or commercial airlines are to be used to ensure insurance coverage is in place.

-          Reserve field trip transport up to 8 months ahead

 

OCTOBER MEETING OF GAC® COUNCIL AND SOMETIMES MAC COUNCIL HELD AT SITE OF (YOUR!) UPCOMING ANNUAL MEETING

 

- Abstract submission site is linked to LOC web site and tested

Ca. November 1. Abstract submission site goes live

 

By 4 Months:

 

-     Session organizers are strongly encouraged (pestered) to make sure that key presenters and other critical participants have been informed of abstract deadline. Organizers may need to be encouraged to “beat the bushes” to make sure sessions are fully subscribed

 

-     Abstract deadline is January 15, or the nearest acceptable weekday. Approximately 80% plus of abstracts will be submitted in the last week and most of these on the last day. Overload on the HQ server may cause problems. TRY TO KEEP THE DEADLINE  DATE FIRM, however, in some cases it may be necessary to   extend the deadline

 

-     Technical Program Chair and session organizers review abstracts and  plan preliminary program using controlled access web site provided by HQ.

-     Authors are informed  of acceptance or rejection by e-mail from HQ, given preliminary presentation schedules and requested to check the web site for further information .

-     Technical Program Chair, and session organizers finalize sessions and overall technical program.

-     Presenters are notified of final  times, dates and rooms for their presentations

-     .

-     Begin assembly of Program and Abstract volumes  Allow plenty of time to proofread program and cross-check author(s) index for abstracts.  Discuss printing or CD ROM production with GAC® Publications Director.

-     In consultation with GAC® and MAC decide how many copies to print of field-trip guidebooks and Program volume, and number of copies of Abstract volume on CD to burn, if applicable. Plan for post-meeting sales and orders.

-     Contact GAC®, MAC and other groups for their business meeting space requirements.  Make this the responsibility of a sub-committee chair.

-     Exhibitors contacted again.

-     Camera-ready copy for MAC Short Course Handbook received.

-     Field Trip Guidebook copy is finalized.

-     Registration chair liaises with HQ concerning setup of registration software and tests system through a trial web site.

 

FEBRUARY MEETING OF GAC® COUNCIL HELD AT SITE OF MEETING FOR YEAR+1 ANNUAL MEETING

 

By 3 Months:

 

-     mail Final Notice with Registration notification, directing potential attendees to complete registration via the link from the meeting website.

-     Camera-ready copy for MAC Short Course Handbook is submitted to printer.

-     Finalize exhibitors list.

-     Field Trip Committee Chair requests brief itineraries for trips, including addresses and phone numbers of hotels en route, from trip leaders, to send out to field trip registrants.

-     Field Trip Chair books meeting rooms for field trips, if needed.

-     Field Trip Chair urges and reminds Field Trip Leaders to communicate trip specific details to participants. 

-     Technical Services Chair arranges for projectionists, projectors, sound systems and other AV equipment, and establishes a schedule for training personnel.

-     Final copies of Program and  Field Trip Guidebooks are submitted to printer.

-     Abstract volume text is sent for CD-ROM production.

-     Computers facilities for Speaker ready room arranged

-     HQ registration site is linked to LOC web site and tested

-     Online Registration starts ca. March 1st

 

By 2 Months:

 

-     Early registration (at cheap rate) deadline is generally mid April.

-     Registration chair makes arrangements for onsite registration in coordination with HQ.

-     Any field trips and short courses that are undersubscribed are generally cancelled at this point and refunds issued by HQ.

-     Registration chair makes sure that conference bags and any material to be inserted is ordered (badges, receipts etc. are done by HQ).

-     Field Trip registrants are notified of acceptance by letter that provides itinerary, telephone numbers and specified place and time to meet before departure.

 

By 6 Weeks:

 

-     Program-at-a-Glance (searchable program and abstract database) is  posted to conference website

-     All necessary personnel are lined up for manning of registration area throughout the meeting.

-     Publicity Chair approaches local media people (press, radio, TV) to arrange for coverage of meeting.

 

By 4 Weeks:

 

-     Final check of all meeting rooms and facilities, including office.

-     Session chairs are given information on the facilities of the room they will chair sessions in, as well as a reminder of their responsibilities and duties.

-     Final arrangements made for computers, printers, telephones, cash registers, tables, etc. for registration area.

 

By 2 Weeks:

 

-     Assemble handouts for attendees who have not pre-registered.

-     Inspect AV equipment

-     Abstract volume CD’s burnt

-     On-line registration ends. HQ begin preparation of registration badges, social tickets, receipts etc and courier these to the LOC for packing into registration kits.

 

By 1 Week:

 

-     Last-minute arrangements for registration area are made.

-     Set up exhibits, registration area and signs 1 to 2 days before meeting begins.

-     Ready meeting rooms, including those scheduled for business meetings.

-     AV and related equipment (spares) set up and practice runs with personnel held - not less than one day before meeting.

-     Set up telephones in registration area at least 2 days before meeting. One of these will be needed by the HQ registration supervisor for a point-of-sale credit card machine and should be enabled for long distance calling.

-     Computer facilities for electronic review of presentations checked.

-     Begin pre-meeting field trips.

-     Set up press room and press kits.

 

Meeting Begins:

 

-     Entire LOC now in shock.

-     At least one senior person to be always on hand in registration area when open.

-     Cheques and cash received are banked during day, or at close of registration time (assign this duty to one person).

-     Hold press conference scheduled by Publicity Chair.

 

Meeting Ends:

 

-     Begin post-meeting field trips.

-     Channel all bills through LOC Finance Committee.

 

1 Month after Meeting:

 

-     Final budgets for field trips submitted to Field Trip Chair.

 

3 Months after Meeting:

 

-     Submit preliminary report to GAC® and MAC Councils and other associations, if applicable.

 

4 Months after Meeting:

 

-     Final comprehensive report with recommendations for future meetings submitted to GAC® and MAC Councils, in time for their fall meetings.  This report should also recommend specific edits and changes to the  Annual meeting guide.  Copies of the final report and all circulars sent to Headquarters for archives, and to all existing LOCs to help in their Annual Meeting planning.

 

6 Months after Meeting:

 

-     An unaudited financial statement must be submitted to GAC® headquarters by the LOC by Nov. 30th.

-     Books are audited professionally by chartered accountants.

-     Accounts settled with GAC® and MAC and other associations.

 

12 Months after Meeting:

 

-          Books are closed.

 


THE WORK OF THE LOC:  GETTING STARTED

 

Structure and Meetings

Precisely what sub-committees are convened, and what kind of a hierarchical scheme is established, is up to each Local Organizing Committee.  However, every Annual Meeting will require committees, which can consist of one or more people, on Technical Program including Short Courses,  Finance, Accommodation, Entertainment, Publicity, Exhibits, Technical Services, Registration, Transportation, Accompanying Members Program, Short Courses, and Field Trips.  Additional committees may be necessary but, in general, the fewer these are in number, the better.

 

It seems wise to set up the committees at least 2 years in advance and to hold regular meetings thereafter.  This practice has the double advantage of reminding people that there is a meeting coming up, and informing the General Chair and sub-committee chairs what progress has been achieved and what problems remain.  Keeping full minutes of each meeting may be a valuable lever in getting people to carry out the tasks they accepted at an earlier meeting!  The LOC should appoint a Recording Secretary whose responsibility will be to record the minutes of meetings. To avoid confusion, the General Chair should either be involved in, or at least aware of, major decisions that affect the meeting.  It is encouraged to decide early on how to deal with communications between sub-committee chairs:  meetings, however formal or informal, should lead to a minimum of misunderstanding as to who is to do what, how, when, and with whom.  Make sure at least two people on every sub-committee know the details of their committee's work, in the event one becomes ill or otherwise indisposed. If the sub-committee consists of one person, then it is imperative that at least one other person on the LOC knows the details of that persons work. Also, discourage key LOC people from presenting papers, running sessions or leading field trips - they will be busy enough with Annual Meeting matters.

 

Setting the Date

The annual GAC®/MAC meeting is traditionally held in the second or third week of May. However, May is also a time when other societies hold important meetings, and both GAC® and MAC are committed to interacting with associations at the Executive level to try and reduce the number of conflicts between conferences. Unfortunately, conflicts persist, and so it would be wise for the LOC to check whether there are any obvious conflicts before deciding on a suitable date. GAC® and MAC Councils need to agree on the dates for the meeting. As soon as they are decided they will be advertised on the GAC® and MAC websites, and as widely as possible. The associations involved in the conference and the LOC should contact organizations if the conference is not listed on calendar of events for those organizations. It is also important to try to avoid overlapping the Holiday weekend of May (third Monday). Business meetings, field trips and short courses normally take several days immediately prior to or following the Annual Meeting. These must be taken in account for date selection.

 

Logo and Stationery

Recent years have seen the growth of a tradition whereby each Annual Meeting adopts a distinctive logo.  Some are the result of an open competition among members of the host institution, and this may be the first activity that generates interest and enthusiasm among potential Annual Meeting workers.  Some LOCs have used their logos as the basis for special promotional materials, e.g. T-shirts.

 

Bearing in mind that most communication is via electronic means the volume of printed stationary required is relatively small, LOCs may wish to develop an electronic letterhead template which can be automatically appended to correspondence. A small amount of stationary may be required.  Envelopes should be printed as well.

 

Website

With the move to electronic communication, the development of a user friendly website specifically dedicated to the annual meeting has become the first point of contact for conference attendees and for promoting the meeting. The website can be prominently displayed, publicized in the geoscience community. A website template is available from GAC® HQ to the LOC to ‘personalize’ for their specific meeting.

 

It is recommended that the LOC hires the GAC® website co-ordinator to create their website with all information, logos and pictures supplied by the LOC.


FINANCES

 

Preamble

Obviously financing is one of the most important aspects of any meeting, scientific or otherwise.  Under no circumstances should the meeting be budgeted to run at a loss or merely break even; the meeting should be planned to yield a profit.  The secret to avoiding a deficit is for the LOC to set up a break-even budget based on 70% of the best estimate of attendance.  Where organizations other than GAC® and MAC are sponsors, the general financial aspects of each annual meeting (split of operating surplus/loss) will need to be negotiated among all parties.  The initial agreement can be negotiated by the LOC, although the development of the formal agreement is the responsibility of the Councils/Executives of the host associations.

 

A financial statement of the meeting needs to be prepared by an auditor. To avoid surprises and to help overall preparation of this statement, early links with an accountant or auditor are strongly encouraged. The LOC is responsible for hiring an accountant to do a simple audit of the bank accounts and activities and to provide a statement to the GAC® auditor.

 

Initial Budgeting and Fund-raising

The Finance Committee Chairman should be completely familiar with the establishment of budgets and the production of financial statements.  If possible, one member of his committee should be an accountant.  If not, then the Finance Committee should meet early in its work with an accountant, preferably the one who will audit the books after the meeting, and have him/her recommend accounting procedures to be followed.  Accounting should be by the ledger system with computer back-up for quick print-outs.  The most important aspect of finances is the striking of a reasonable budget.

 

Budgets should be prepared for at least three different estimates of attendance and reviewed with the GAC® and MAC Executives. In preparing their budget LOCs are reminded that events such as field trips, short courses, social events, while integral to the meeting, are to be budgeted on a cost recovery basis, independent of the overall financial success of the meeting. A sample budget is available with this guide.

 

The overall budget of the Annual Meeting should be struck so as to break even on the basis of realizing 70 percent of the conservative best estimate of attendance.

 

In all calculations and estimates (fee and payment estimates), taxes should be included as a separate  accounting entry. It may be possible to claim GST back on some items. All fees for registration, short courses etc. must include GST or HST.  The GAC® auditor will complete the GST return, including both the GST paid and GST collected for the meeting.

 

Watch out for pitfalls in estimating corporate donations, income from exhibits and attendance at social events. It is best to treat donations and fund raising revenues as zero in the initial budget. Minimum figures  for the other items should be included in the budget proposal. Experience has shown that potential donors should be told what function or service they are being asked to support, although 'open-ended' funds have been obtained in the past.  Government, industry, and occasionally university sources are among the more obvious potential donors.  Donors should be advised that they will be acknowledged on the website, at the conference, and in appropriate publications.

 

In establishing the budget, the fee structure must be set.  This has been highly variable in the past and is dependent on a number of conditions.

 

If, for example, some entertainment is to be covered, then the general registration fee will reflect this.  In any event, the establishment of the fee structure locks the meeting into a financial straight-jacket, and this must be done with the best possible handle on the overall budget.  Because the latter reflects individual committee estimates, each committee chair must prepare proposals that are as accurate as possible

 

 

Handling Funds Before the Meeting

Everyone involved in the planning of the meeting should understand how bills will be paid.  Set up a system of approval of invoices by those with cheque-signing authority before payment.  All approved invoices should be initialled and paid by the Finance Committee Chair and co-signed by a committee member.  The invoice record should show the date of payment and cheque number.  For absolute control of cash outflow, the number of signing authorities should be kept to a minimum.  No cheques should be issued without a covering invoice or memo.

 

Signing authority for bank accounts and major expenditures should require a minimum of two persons, three might be preferable.

 

'Seed' money is normally made available by the GAC® and MAC to the LOC 12 months in advance of the meeting.  In recent years GAC® has provided $15,000-$18,000 as 'front-end' money. This is rarely paid in one lump sum but, rather, advanced as the need arises.  So that the parent associations can manage their own cash flow, LOCs should propose a schedule of payments when the first advance is requested. MAC generally provides $5,000 in ‘seed’ money in a single payment to the LOC on demand, usually 8-12 months prior to the meeting, with the request going to the MAC President

 

Accountable advances by cheques (not cash) should be given to those members of the committee who require them (e.g. Social Chair, Field Trip Chair and those field trip leaders who require advance money).  A monthly statement of receipts and disbursements should be produced.  The regular production of a statement of this kind helps planning as the financial picture becomes clearer.

 

All funds not immediately required should be deposited in short-term accounts.  This practice is recommended only if the financial aspects of the meeting are well in hand.  Enough cash must be kept in the checking account to cover pre-meeting field trips and general expenses.

 

Taxes

The GAC® and MAC do not have charitable organization status, and thus normally must pay Federal and Provincial sales taxes on purchases.  Some provinces do, however, grant sales-tax exemptions to organizations such as ours.  Generally all GAC® events for which there is a fee will be subject to GST or HST at least. The LOC is responsible for determining what local rules apply to taxation. The applicable tax components and the method of calculation should be passed to the registration supervisor at HQ so that they can be built into the registration database.

 

LOCs that are successful in securing large donations should contact GAC® HQ as these may qualify for tax deduction status for the contributor. In such cases the funds would flow through the GAC® Fund of the Canadian Geological Foundation.

 

G.S.T.

The LOC must obtain a GST Registration number from Revenue Canada.  It may speed up the process if you can tell Revenue Canada representatives the number that was issued to the Annual Meeting LOC in the previous year, so check this.  Some institutions may refuse to pay accounts for their delegates unless you can provide this number.  Obtain a supply of the relevant forms from Revenue Canada for foreign delegates -- they can use these to apply for a rebate on purchases and services in Canada.  Consult your accountant about the best methods of recording GST transactions.

 

Handling Funds During the Meeting

Once the meeting is in progress, the Finance Committee is charged with balancing the day's take, banking, and overseeing the general ticket sales, refunding and cashiering procedures.  The signing authorities must be available on a regular basis to ensure that last-minute purchases and payments can be made.  Since $20,000 or more may be handled daily, the balancing of each day's receipts is absolutely necessary.  Some cash will be required, but the remainder must be banked each day.  Arrangements for late-night deposits can normally be made with the bank. The LOC is responsible for ensuring that any monies collected on site, eg. Registration, social events, field trips, etc. are reported separately. Any registration monies collected are forwarded to HQ.

 

Using Plastic

Payment by VISA and MASTERCARD credit cards is an integral feature of on-line and on-site registration. The HQ registration supervisor will generally have a point-of-sale (POS) card reader available at the on-site desk. This may be used by the LOC for other credit card services, provided these are arranged in advance. HQ can take advantage of relatively low rates for VISA and MASTERCARD transactions 

 

Disbursements After the Meeting

After the conclusion of the meeting any seed money received should be returned to the sponsoring societies. The books for a given meeting can be closed anywhere from 6 to 12 months after the conclusion of the meeting. An accountant should be retained by the LOC to review the activity in the account and to produce a financial statement to be sent to GAC® HQ for forwarding to the GAC® auditor. Any fees charged by the accountant to produce this audit  must be built into the meeting budget.

 

The GAC® Auditor will then combine the meeting statement with the registration financial statement to provide a complete financial statement for the sponsoring societies. This statement will identify any profit/loss of the conference as well as the distribution of the profit/loss among the societies. 

 

Traditionally the division of the Annual Meeting surplus provides for the return of 20% of the surplus to the Organizing Committee of the Final Report of the meeting and, on receipt (by GAC® and MAC Councils) of an acceptable proposal for promoting the earth sciences in the community. In the case where additional societies have sponsored the meeting the sharing of any profit/loss is a matter of negotiation between the participating societies.

 

 


COMMUNICATIONS (Website, Notices,  Abstract Volume)

 

Preamble

Previous LOCs have produced large volumes of printed, static, material, used to publicize the meeting, that was mailed to GAC® and MAC members and potential attendees. Production and mailing costs for this material was prohibitive. In recent years a move has been made to reduce the volume and amount of printed material and replace it with a website where meeting updates can be quickly communicated to potential attendees.

Beginning with St. Catharines 2004, three printed notices were produced, each of which prominently displayed the conference website as the place to visit to get up to date information concerning the planning and program for the annual meeting.

 

The notices serve to provide a hardcopy reminder that the meeting is approaching, the meeting theme, planned sessions, GAC® and MAC logos, as well as other sponsors, etc. All of this information can be included on one sheet 8-1/2” x 17”, folded into three to five panels. They also serve to remind recipients to visit the conference website for updates as the conference approaches.  As this sheet can fit into a regular size envelope it can easily be mailed at the regular rate and/or included in a bulk mailing from the sponsoring associations or societies.

 

It is GAC® and MAC policy that copies of all meeting notices are sent to all GAC® and MAC members regardless of whether or not they intend to attend.  This is a means of keeping abreast of current developments and is one of the benefits of membership in the two associations.

 

The cost of mailing the notices is the responsibility of the LOC, however with planning and communication with GAC® and MAC the single page notices may be included in regular mailing to members of each association. Advance communication and printing will ensure that the mailing costs are kept to a minimum.

 

 

French Translation

 

With the exception of the abstracts, all material in the printed notices and on the website must be published in English and French. It is GAC® and MAC policy that all text material included on the written notices and the conference website must be in both French and English. The provision of copy in both official languages is the responsibility of the LOC.

 

Translation must be of the highest quality and it is the responsibility of the LOC to provide material for the notices and the conference website in both languages.  Poorly translated material can result in miscommunica­tion and confusion.  In one instance translated material was incomprehensible.  Re-translation can put organising committees behind schedule resulting in considerable additional costs.  Poorly translated material results in a loss of respect for GAC® and MAC.  For these reasons it is recommended that LOCs make use of the sanctioned translator listed below. 

 

      Jean Alfred Renaud

VERSION Translating and Editing Services

1201, rue Fairmount

Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1H 3N9

tel: (819) 820-2393

fax: (819) 565-4530

email: version@multi-medias.ca

 

Alternatively, if you choose to use an unsanctioned translator, headquarters is to be given an opportunity to audit his/her work to ensure the quality of the translation services provided.

 

Website

All matters related to the meeting can be easily made available to potential attendees via the conference website. The website provides a live, active, easily updated reference that can be built over time to highlight the development and the planning for the meeting.

 

It is recommended that each annual meeting use the services of the GAC® Website co-ordinator who has developed a website template based on the St. Catharines 04 and Halifax 05 meetings. The website  co-ordinator can customize the website template, eg. logo, dates, sponsors, etc., and updates for the meeting with input and information provided by the LOC. Alternatively the LOC may develop their own website ensuring that, as a minimum, all features used by previous meetings, are present. Links to the Abstract and Registration sites hosted at GAC® HQ can be activated at the appropriate dates.

 

The website will be completed as the build up to the meeting progresses and will contain links to the technical program, Program-at-a-Glance, registration, recognition of sponsors etc, as the meeting dates approach.

 

The First Notice

The First Notice is the preliminary announcement of the Annual Meeting, and appears at the previous GAC®/MAC meeting.  It should provide information on where and when the meeting will be held, the theme/focus of the meeting (if any), what sessions are planned and, in general, the suggested field trips.  The GAC® and the MAC should be clearly identified, along with any other organizations co-sponsoring the meeting. The name and address of contact person(s) must also be included. This information is provided in both English and French (this is essential). This notice should also prominently display the web site address for the meeting.

 

Copies should be sent to universities, federal and provincial surveys, and mining and petroleum companies.

 

The Second Notice

The Second Notice, normally mailed in September, before the meeting, provides information about the technical sessions, workshops, short courses, field trips, and social events.  The Second Notice includes the call for Abstracts and directs authors to the conference website to submit their abstract(s). Electronic submission is the norm with authors guided through the submission process via the abstract submission website, hosted at GAC® HQ, with a direct link from the conference website. The Abstract submission website can be customized by each LOC, (e.g. logos, sponsors, deadline for submission, etc.). An indication of when authors should expect to hear back as to whether their abstract has been accepted or not should be included on this site, as well as contact information for an individual from the LOC (normally the Technical Program Chair) to contact in case of difficulties.

 

Abstracts may be submitted in either English or French.  Authors should be advised that those submitting messy abstracts either will have them returned, rejected, or retyped at a cost of $50.00 or more per abstract. Authors should be clearly advised that late abstracts will not be accepted. Include a prominent notice, on the Abstract submission website, that requests for changes to abstracts, by the submitting author(s) will not be undertaken. Under only very specific instances should the editing of abstracts, after submission, be undertaken by the Technical Program Chair

 

The Second Notice should be mailed (first-class) by October 1 to all GAC® and MAC members.  Because the deadline for the receipt of abstracts is mid January, it is imperative that the Second Notice be as widely distributed as possible well in advance of the abstract deadline

 

The Final Notice

The Final Notice, mailed well in advance of the Early Registration Deadline, serves to remind individuals that the meeting is approaching, the registration website is open and that accommodations can be arranged via conference website links. At this point the website will be fully functional with visitors able to access all information pertinent to the meeting.

 

 

Program and Abstract Volumes

The Program and Abstract volumes are the detailed guide to the Annual Meeting and the most complete record of all its proceedings,  with both being compiled by the LOC for distribution at the meeting.

 

The largest printing job for the LOC is the Program Volume, which is included in registration packages for the meeting. The Program Volume will generally include:

 

1.      the Program-at-a-Glance;

2.      Technical Program summary (including symposia, special and general sessions, short courses(s), workshops(s), field trips;

3.      detailed program, listed day by day;

4.      special events, social and accompanying members events;

5.      Schedule of business meetings, pre-, syn- and post conference;

6.      any visitor information pertinent to the host venue;

7.      a complete list of exhibitors;

8.      maps of the conference venue (city, campus/hotel, etc.);

9.      any other information, including promotional material from the sponsoring societies, to be communicated to attendees.

 

The abstracts and program are available on-line through the Program-at-a-Glance routine, and accessed from the meeting website. . However, this may not be identical to the final published volume and should not be cited as a reference.

 

An electronic, usually PDF, and a hardcopy version of the Abstract Volume must be identical to one another to follow current ISSN guidelines. The layout is prepared by the LOC using data provided from the Abstract database once the program is completed. (See later section on Abstract Submission and Program Development).

 

The LOC may opt to provide either an Abstract  CD of the PDF file or an exact printed version of the PDF file to meeting registrants. Both the electronic (CD) and  the hardcopy must be available for sale and distribution through GAC® and, at MAC’s option, through MAC. This  ensures the widespread distribution of the Abstract volume to libraries and researchers and appropriate citation of the work. The PDF version will be archived and accessible from the GAC® website.

 

The layout should be designed with the final printed version in mind, using as little white space as reasonably possible - two-column format with 8 or 9 point typeface preferred. The hardcopy version is currently the official 'referenced' copy. The electronic version should be in PDF format, where the page numbers are identical to those in the hardcopy. Both must contain:

 

1.      the abstracts (alphabetical by first author's last name),

2.      an index (author's name, and the page number of each abstract to which they contributed)

3.      ISBN (assigned by GAC® HQ) with the ISSN of the Abstracts series (0701-8738)

4.      Usually some 'credit' pages - a thank-you from the organizers or a listing of the people who handled the meeting; any advertising (the LOC would arrange this); errata from the program; etc. These pages should be numbered with Roman symbols (i, ii, x, etc.)

5.      An outside back 'ad' for the next Meeting.

6.      A cover which somehow pays tribute to the meeting, and includes the names of all contributing associations (GAC®, MAC, CSPG, etc.), the meeting's title, the year of the meeting, the ISBN and ISSN, and the Number of the Abstracts Volume (2005 was Volume 30; 2006 would be Volume 31; etc.).

 

The hardcopy Abstract Volume is presold to members when they renew membership, up to 6 months before the meeting, and is available for sale after the meeting (with the cost based on the cost of production). GAC® also sells the Abstract Volume at the meeting as well as after the meeting from the GAC® On-line Bookstore. GAC® HQ handles printing (on demand) from the LOC provided PDF if the LOC opts for an Abstract CD or if the LOC opts for a printed version purchases a number of copies, at cost.

 

The LOC is responsible for producing CD ROMs of the Abstract volume for inclusion in the registration package.

 

The Organizing Committee must contact GAC® Headquarters and MAC to determine the number of additional copies of the CD or hardcopy version, as applicable, each association requires for distribution to corporate sponsors, etc. The LOC charges, at cost, each association for the additional copies.

 

Finally, it would be helpful if the Program and Abstract volumes contained a brief statement about GAC® and MAC and the membership benefits of both.  Indeed, the parent associations may wish to encourage new members to join at the Annual Meeting by making some kind of special offer, as for example, a rebate on non-member registration fees.

 

If the LOC has any technical questions, they can probably be answered by the GAC® Publications Committee Chair, or the Chair of the Printing and Publications Sub-committee of the previous Annual Meeting.  Take advantage of their expertise:  consultation with them can save hundreds of dollars.

 

Detailed instructions for the preparation of the Abstract Volume can be found in Appendix 1F.

 


THE TECHNICAL PROGRAM

 

General

The technical program generally consists of Symposia, Special Sessions, General Sessions, Poster Sessions, and, on occasion, Short Courses and Workshops. Field Trips are an important part of the Technical Program, but the LOC should have a person dedicated to organizing and coordinating this part of the program. The exact make-up of each Annual Meeting is, of course, the prerogative of the LOC, although the advice of the host organizations and suggestions by the geoscience community should be considered, particularly as the success of the conference is intimately related to the vitality of the Technical Program. The program should appeal to the membership of the host associations, and should be balanced in terms of its local, regional, national, and international appeal.

 

Symposia and Special Sessions are typically proposed by groups or individuals, some of whom may come from the local geoscience community. The Technical Program Chair should solicit ideas from the membership of the host associations, and the geoscience community at large, in order to develop the Technical Program. GAC® Sections and Divisions may prove a valuable resource to the LOC in developing the program as they can provide input on new and exciting developments in their fields and serve to identify lead individuals as session convenors. Close liaison with the Field Trip Chair will be important as the registrants are often attracted by linked field trips and technical sessions. In addition, groups that propose Short Courses or Workshops should be encouraged to design a symposia or special session around the same subject.

 

Number and duration of session

Any particular session may run from as little as a half-day to as much as three full days, but overall, the technical program should be no longer than three days.  In recent years, as many as 10-13 sessions have been run simultaneously, but the program should be so designed that it is feasible for an individual delegate to transfer between sessions without too much difficulty.  At each Annual Meeting there are a few complaints about low attendance at sessions late on the final afternoon.  Certainly, some delegates may have to leave early to catch flights, but the LOC should plan as far as possible so as to avoid conflicts between technical sessions and the departure times of post-meeting field trips, for example. Each oral presentation is designed to fit within a 20-minute time slot (15 minute presentation and 5 minutes for questions). Some invited keynote papers may be longer than the standard 20-minute presentation, but must fit the module schedule (i.e. 40 minutes or 60 minutes).

 

Program scheduling

As much as possible, symposia and sessions even remotely related in interest should not be scheduled against one another.  However, in some cases this is unavoidable, and so the approach would be to make sure that related sessions are located in nearby lecture rooms.

 

Symposia

These are the featured sessions of the Annual Meeting, with the topics either of current general interest or specially relevant to the region.  Most, if not all, of the papers are by invitation, and the content of the symposium is often 'programmed' to ensure coverage of the particular subject matter.  Publication of symposia proceedings is encouraged, subject to the usual constraints of peer review and approval by the editor.  The association sponsoring the symposia should be allowed to publish the proceedings of the symposium, if they so desire, and should at least be given right of first refusal. For examples, many GAC® Special Papers, and issues of Canadian Mineralogist have had their origins in GAC®/MAC symposium.

 

Each symposium has an organizer who is responsible for planning the session, inviting the speakers, refereeing the abstracts, setting the schedule of speakers and, if applicable, obtaining funding from the sponsoring body.  Obviously, the symposium organizer must work hand in hand with the LOC Technical Program Chair and keep the latter informed of progress.  Symposia are frequently sponsored by one of the parent societies (GAC® or MAC), by an affiliated body (e.g. GAC® division), or possibly even jointly by one of the parent bodies and a third party (e.g. IGCP).  Sponsorship normally implies some form of support for the symposium such as a commitment to publish the proceedings or possibly a contribution toward the expenses of invited speakers.  Where the sponsor is providing funding for speakers' expenses, this has normally been handled outside the financial structure of the meeting.

 

Special Sessions

Special Sessions are normally subject or discipline oriented and last up to 2 days.  They differ from symposia in having few if any invited papers.  However, just like symposia, the special sessions are proposed by individuals or groups, and it is the responsibility of these people to advertise the specific sessions, plan the scheduling of talks, and obtain sponsorship if possible.  Publication may or may not follow, and right of first refusal should be given to the sponsoring associations.

 

General Sessions

General Sessions provide a venue for presenting discipline-oriented material of general interest.  Invited papers are rare, as is publication in any sort of collected volume.  In Ottawa (1997) and Quebec City (1998), all general sessions were posters.

 

Poster Sessions

Poster Sessions are essentially displays lasting 1/2 or a full day, during which the author agrees to be on hand to discuss his/her abstract and display.  Normally, at GAC®-MAC Conferences the posters are displayed for a full day. Authors are not allowed to present the same paper in an oral presentation and as a poster presentation. For several years, GAC®-MAC Annual Meetings have allocated the 16:30 to 18:30 period each day for the presenters to be on hand at their posters.  The actual time can be suggested by the LOC, but must not conflict with oral technical sessions. Try to have the Poster Sessions in the same area, or close to, the exhibits -- this will increase traffic to your exhibitors’ booths.  A bar in the exhibits/poster area is desirable. The poster sessions are often a superb meeting place for delegates at the conference, and so the location of the poster sessions and exhibits should be carefully chosen.

 

Starting at the Victoria ’95 annual meeting, the GAC® has sponsored the Remick Poster Awards.  These awards are given annually to the three best poster presentations, based on their scientific content, organization and presentation of data, as well as their aesthetics. Gold, silver and bronze certificates are awarded and accompanied by cash prizes.  Appendix 3 (an Excel and a Word document) details past award winners, judges, and award amounts. Responsibility for organizing the panel of judges for the poster awards falls to the Science Program Chair of GAC® Council or a designated member of the Science Program Committee.

 

Public Awareness of Earth Sciences

The Local Organizing Committee of the Annual General Meeting is strongly encouraged to designate Public Awareness of Earth Science (PAES) as part of the Technical Program with its own designated coordinator.  Local earth scientists involved in PAES activities and/or individuals associated with local museums or science centres are commonly willing and suitable candidates for such a position.

 

PAES components of the AGM could include symposia on aspects of delivering earth science to the public, associated field trips and/or workshops, and public lectures.  The past year’s recipient of the E.R. Ward Neale Medal could be considered as a potential public speaker.  It is also suggested to take advantage of local geological issues and / or recent media events that have involved earth science and captured the public’s attention.

 

It is desirable to invite both scientists and the public to the PAES program.  Educators are a prime potential public participant and it is advised to coordinate efforts with local educators in the early stages of PAES program development.  This will aid in determining topics of local interest and need and encouraging local educators to plan their participation.  It is encouraged to develop workshops and field trips to provide training for educators on how to present earth science to students and utilize local geological features in their programs.  It is strongly advised to consult with the EdGeo standing committee on programs for educators.

 

In order to encourage teacher participation, it is recommended that the one day registration fee be waived for Teachers attending the AGM.

 

Quality Control

The LOC is responsible for ensuring that technical sessions are up to professional standards.  This is done initially by refereeing of abstracts, to be arranged by the LOC.  Complaints about the quality of technical presentations are very common, and there is continual discussion in GAC® and MAC Councils about ways to improve this.  Problems arise from poor delivery, indigestible power point slides and overheads, carelessness and sloppiness on the part of the speaker or even the session chair, and a general air of non-professionalism.  These are by no means restricted to the younger or more inexperienced speakers - old hands are often the worst offenders.

 

The LOC should carefully consider ways to improve quality control.  Chairs of individual sessions should be able to contribute, if their responsibilities are clearly outlined to them.  The LOC may itself take a hand by referring speakers, as soon as their abstracts have been accepted, to the following websites which reference:

1) the well-known AAPG Slide Manual or to other useful guidelines (http://carbon.hampshire.edu/~mbruno/ns129/truly_terrible_talk.html), or,

2)  AGU, circulates the very pointed 'Guidelines for Giving a Truly Terrible Talk'.

http://andrew.ucsd.edu/cosmos/Projects/AGU%20Guidelines.pdf

 

The GAC® and MAC Program Committees should be consulted on these matters.

 

Session Chairs

The Technical Program Committee should identify chairs well before the meeting and ensure that they know what is expected of them.  It is wise to have two persons for each session; in the event of lighting failure or other disasters, one can ad lib while the other seeks help.  One way to involve out-of-town people in the meeting is as session chairs.

 

By accepting the job, chairs agree to help make the meeting worthwhile to attendees, for effective technical sessions are essential to a successful meeting.  Chairs should, wherever possible, contact speakers in their session well before the meeting to offer assistance, to inform speakers of any rating scheme to be used, and especially to ensure that speakers are aware of the mode of presentation supported for the meeting.  They should familiarize themselves with the speakers' names and topics and, if possible, meet with speakers prior to the start of sessions.  A speaker breakfast is a good way to arrange this.

 

Chairs should determine in advance that projection, public-address, and lighting equipment are arranged and working smoothly, and that drinking water, and pointers are easily available.  Keep talks on schedule!  It may be easier to be firm if you put yourself in the place of the speaker scheduled for the last presentation of the session you are chairing, or of an audience member who wishes to arrive during the session to hear a specified talk slated for a definite time.  Announce in advance that you will firmly abide by the schedule, then do so!

 

The normal time allotment for presentation is only 15 minutes for presentation, with 5 minutes reserved for discussion.  Failure to keep this commitment is a disservice to potential discussant and speaker alike.  Each speaker should be given a 3-minute warning before time expires and should be cut-off if he/she does not stop speaking.  Should a speaker fail to appear for his/her scheduled talk, do not move the succeeding papers up.  Instead, substitute a coffee break and then resume with the rest of the schedule.  Be sure that all questions, answers, and commentary are heard by all in the room.  If floor microphones are available, insist that participants in the audience use them; if not, repeat questions so that all may know what has been said.

 

The chairs should use judgement to guide the discussion along lines of interest to the participants in general.  Defer the pursuit of small matters of investigative techniques and procedures and trivial geologic details for private discussion outside the session room.  Beware of the pitfall of 'private' dialogue between speaker and 'friend' in the audience.  Feel free to make any summation or other remarks at the close of each discussion or presentation, thus aiding in providing a thread of continuity for the session.

 

Session Organizers – Responsibilities

The following is a listing of some roles and responsibilities that session organizers may be expected to fulfill in the run up to and at the meeting:

·         may suggest elements to be included in the program, e.g. symposia, special sessions, short courses, etc.

·         identify session sponsors

·         identify keynote speakers

·         arrange and contact potential contributors to the session

·         contact speakers prior to the meeting and assist with problems and or questions

·         review submitted abstracts for the session

·         accept or reject submitted abstracts

·         determine the duration of keynote or other presentations, as necessary

·         arrange the order of presentations

·         designate oral and poster presentations

·         identifies suitable co-chair, if necessary

·         chairs the session, welcoming participants, introducing speakers, keep to the schedule, thank speakers, guides discussion.

 

 

Technical Services

The most important considerations include size of room for a particular session, access for audience, controls to lighting, microphones and ventilation, and possibility of noise from local sources (other meeting rooms, kitchen, etc.).  Trailing cords and wires, and elevated speaker's platforms provide ideal conditions for spectacular events preceding, during or following talks.  Try to minimize possible problems by pre-meeting inspection of facilities, and by keeping facilities as simple as possible.

 

Beginning in 2004, with the approval of GAC® and MAC Councils, a move was made to electronic presentations only being supported, i.e. no 35 mm slide projection facilities. Most presenters now routinely travel with their presentation on a memory stick or burnt onto a CD.

 

This requires that the LOC, in their planning include this in information made available to potential authors. Most presenters are familiar with electronic presentation, i.e. PowerPoint. The LOC should clearly provide the specifications of the operating system and program version/edition that will be supported at the meeting. Keep this to a single system/version to reduce the number of possible foul-ups. As part of the technical program organization, computer facilities for previewing, editing and saving presentations should be made available to speakers.

In addition overhead projector facilities should be provided.

 

Session chairs should be computer savvy and the LOC, through the Program Chair, can provide a single training session at the beginning of each day to chairs to familiarize themselves with the equipment/facilities.

 

For each room make it the responsibility of the Session chair to ensure that all technical services are maintained throughout the session. However, Session Chairs must also be informed of the procedures to be followed in case of significant computer malfunctions.


ABSTRACT SUBMISSION AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

 

Responsibilities:

GAC® HQ Registration office will host and maintain the abstract database. The database serves as the site for collection of abstracts, for their display for review purposes, through a controlled access web site, development of the on-line Program-at-a-Glance and for export of raw abstract text. The abstract submission process is managed by the HQ Registration Supervisor – a permanent position at HQ - with assistance from the LOC Technical Program Chair.

The LOC Program Committee will be responsible for providing meeting specific details (names, dates, etc.) program information (sessions, chairs, method of presentations, etc.), review and acceptance of abstracts, program development and for publication of the program and abstract volume(s).

Critical Time-Lines:

The precise deadlines will be set by the LOC, however, these will approximate the following timetable:

Mid-late October (prior to the meeting).  The Abstract Submission portion of the database and web-linking software system is re-configured on the basis of information provided by the LOC.  The LOC will need to supply French translations for all program information that is submitted.

Late October - The Second Notice.  Prior to November of the year preceding the meeting, the LOC prepares its Second Notice (see below), the main purpose of which is to advertise the meeting and serves as the call for abstracts.  The notice is generally mailed in late October.

November 1.  Abstract submission opens on-line.

Ca. January 15.  Abstract submission closes but at the LOC’s request may be extended.  In practice the system is usually left running for at least a few days past the deadline, and in rare circumstances left open longer.

January 25 - February 15.  Abstracts are reviewed by the LOC Program Committee, with assistance from session chairs, and a preliminary program is prepared.

Ca March 8.  E-mail acceptance letters are sent out to all accepted presenters.

Late March – early April.  An on-line Program-at-a-Glance is developed (see below for details).  This is continually updated as the program matures.

Late April – Early May.  E-mail reminders are sent to presenters who have not registered.

Ca May 15.  E-mail reminders are sent to all presenters to check the web-site for the latest version of the program.

The Second Notice – Call for Abstracts

Wide distribution of the Second Notice will ensure that potential authors are made aware of the Call for Abstracts and the deadline for submission. The Second Notice also serves to direct authors and potential attendees to the conference website for further information regarding the conference and submitting an abstract.

The abstract submission instructions are posted on the GAC® HQ site via a link from the LOC web site.  These instructions should be checked by the LOC and revised as needed prior to the system going on-line.

Abstract Submission

The preferred route for abstract submission is via the LOC’s conference web site (linked to the Registration Office web site).  Provision is made for submission as an e-mail attachment but only as a back-up measure.  The web site contains parallel French and English versions.

Abstracts should be prepared using plain, unformatted (ASCII) 10 point-text, and not exceed 400 words excluding title, authors and addresses.  If the submission requires the use of formatted text, there is provision for the author to upload a formatted MS Word or WordPerfect file.  This can be done from either PC or Mac operating systems.  An abstract fee is not currently charged.

When the author clicks on the abstract submission link on the LOC web site, he/she is seamlessly transferred to the GAC® HQ site in St. John’s.  The opening page is used for both abstract submission and registration, but registration will be disabled at this point.  The page asks whether the presenter wishes to submit a new abstract, in which case he/she is taken to the abstract instructions and thence to the submission pages.  Those who have already submitted an abstract can use a password to renter the site and submit more abstracts.

Submission is a three-step process.  The web site transmits data after each step is completed.

Step 1 asks for:
-Title and authorship of the abstract
-Name and contact address of presenting author
-Telephone and fax numbers; e-mail address
-Session of choice, 1st and 2nd choices
-Invited paper?
-Oral, Poster or either presentation mode?
-Withdraw abstract if preferred mode of presentation cannot be offered?
-Student paper?
-GAC®, MAC or other member? (Yes or No)
-List of co-authors for indexing purposes
-Up to six key words

Step 2 asks the author to paste in the body of the abstract using plain ASCII text (note that provision exists to add some special characters here).

Step 3 allows submission of a formatted Word or WordPerfect file as an upload.  Only to be used if special formatting is required.

Following step 3, the submitter will see a final page confirming receipt of the abstract and giving an abstract number and a password.  The password is needed for submission of further abstracts and for registration.  As abstracts are received they will be automatically entered into the abstract database, which can be viewed through a password-controlled website – see below.  When formatted files are submitted, the Registration Supervisor will paste a copy of the abstract into the database, however, any non-ASCII text, special characters, underlining, bolding or italics will be lost in this process.

 

Potential Abstract Submission Problems

Although the site opens ca. November 1, very few abstracts are received until early in January.  Over 80% of abstracts come in during the last few days of submission with the bulk being submitted in the last 24 hours.  Heavy submission traffic on the last day can result in submissions being timed-out part way through the process, thus resulting in incomplete entries.  The Registration Supervisor (and usually the submitter) will be aware of this.  The Supervisor will then contact the presenter to obtain the missing information.

Acknowledging the Abstract

After each receipt or entry of an abstract, the Registration Supervisor will acknowledge receipt to the submitter – generally by an auto-generated e-mail - and at the same time indicate any missing essential information.  A typical form letter is shown in Appendix 1A.  This will also contain the password for re-entry to the site.

Review and Acceptance Procedures – The Abstract Review and Program Development Web Site

At an early point (generally in November) the Registration office will provide the LOC program chair with the URL and passwords to a controlled-access web site that allows viewing and editing of abstracts and the program.  The Program Chair can either maintain sole control of this, or delegate responsibility to individual session organizers.  Access to each session can be individually password controlled.  The instructions for using the search facility to review abstracts and to develop the program are given in Appendix 1B.

Program Development

Once abstract submission is complete, the program committee will begin developing the technical program.  To a large extent this can be done using the same abstract review website described above.  This site has two views: a default view that displays abstracts in the sessions to which they were submitted by the author, and an “assigned session” view that allows re-assignment and reordering of presentations.  This can be done solely by the Program Chair, or it can be delegated to session organizers with each being given password access to their session only.  The details of the procedure are given in Appendix 1C.  Even though sessions may be largely finalized by late February, cancellations and changing logistical requirements often mean continual reorganization up to the time of printing.

As the program is developed it is vital to inform authors as to whether their presentation has been accepted.  Once acceptance has been finalized, an auto-generated e-mail letter, the text of which is supplied by the Program Chair, is usually sent out by the Registration Supervisor in early March.  An example is shown in Appendix 1D.  Because the program is continually evolving it has been found best at this stage simply to inform authors that their paper has been accepted and to provide essential information as to date, mode and session of presentation.  For other information such as time and location, presenters are referred to the web site.  Rejections must be handled directly by the Program Chair.  In the case of rejections, it is vital that the Program Chair change the abstract status via the web site (see Appendix 1B) – or request the Registration supervisor to do the same – otherwise an acceptance letter will automatically be issued.

The Online Program and Searchable Abstract Database

Once the program is reasonably complete, it should be displayed on the LOC web site using links to the St. John’s HQ database through the routine referred to as Program-at-a-Glance (P-a-a-G).  This is described in Appendix 1E and allows prospective attendees to proceed from a view of the entire technical program to individual sessions and thence to individual abstracts.  These HTML views can be printed using normal browser functions.  The P-a-a-G is drawn from the Access database using ASP routines and reflects any changes made to the database by session organizers.  The P-a-a-G is a powerful and useful tool and should be given prominence on the LOC website.

The P-a-a-G is also searchable by author name, keyword, title or session (see Appendix 1E).  Following the meeting, the P-a-a-G and searchable abstract database are archived on the GAC® web site at http://www.gac.ca/ .  Follow the links to Meetings/Activities, then to Program & Abstracts.

Editing Abstracts

There are two components to editing the abstracts. The first, as noted above, deals with problems associated with pasting abstracts into the database and the  loss of formatting such as special characters, bolding and italics.  It is necessary to restore some of this formatting either for on-line display in the P-a-a-G, or for export to the Abstract volume.  The GAC® HQ staff technical consultants (or the LOC in some circumstances) can restore this through the use of HTML coding.  If done by HQ staff, this formatting will add to the cost of the registration service.  As an alternative, the LOC can use online abstract editing capabilities.  These are described further in Appendix 1E.

The second aspect of editing deals with changes to abstracts requested by authors after submission. It is the perception of some authors that as the abstract has been submitted in an electronic format it can be changed by the LOC right up to the date of the meeting. This view places an unnecessary work load on the program committee. In the instructions to authors it should be made clear that editorial changes after submission will not, under normal circumstances, be carried out.

Development of the Program and Abstract Volumes

Recent practice has been to produce separate Program and Abstract volumes.  The Program is always printed and included in registration kits at the meeting.  In the past, the Abstract volume has generally also been printed and made available for distribution at the meeting.  However, recent practice has been to distribute the Abstract Volume as a CD, in the registration package for delegates, with a paper copy available at an additional charge.  Paper versions are still important since they are sometimes preferred by libraries and institutions.  Both paper and CD versions use the same export and formatting procedures. Abstracts are also made available on line through the Program-at-a-Glance routine on the conference web site and may be individually downloaded prior to the meeting.

The Program Volume is developed by the LOC using program listings exported from the database but generally requires a lot of reorganization and insertion of extra material such as names of session chairs, room locations, sponsors, etc.  It is generally printed on low-cost coloured paper.

The Abstract Volume is presently developed from export of abstracts from the Access database as formatted HTML files, which can then be imported into word processor or desk-top publishing systems for final development (there are alternate means such as export as rtf files).  The details of the process are described further in Appendix 1F.

GAC® Registration Office is responsible for exporting the material, however, from there on it is the responsibility of the LOC to produce the Program and Abstract volumes.  The HTML routine will impart a certain amount of formatting, however, final formatting, page layout and development of author indexes will have to be carried out by the LOC. Plenty of time – at least three weeks - should be allowed for this work in addition to the time required for layout, printing and/or CD writing. 

As stated earlier, the electronic and hardcopy versions of the Abstract Volume must be identical to follow current ISSN guidelines.

The hardcopy Abstract Volume is pre-sold to members when they renew membership, up to 6 months before the meeting, and is available for sale after the meeting (with the cost based on the cost of production). GAC® also sells the Abstract Volume at the meeting as well as after the meeting from the GAC® Bookstore. GAC® HQ handles printing (on demand), from the PDF file provided by the LOC.

 

The LOC is responsible for producing CD ROMs or a hardcopy version of the PDF file of the Abstract Volume for inclusion in the registration package.

The LOC should consult with GAC® Publications Office in St. John's prior to finalizing their print run.

Late Withdrawals

A persistent problem that should be anticipated is that of last-minute withdrawals from the program.  Withdrawals made prior to export from the database should be marked as cancelled and thus be prevented from export.  Withdrawals made after export from the database will have to be handled by the LOC, within the word processor file.  If possible the entire title and abstract should be stricken from both the program and from the abstract volume, however, at a certain point this becomes impractical due the continuous re-formatting that this generates.  At this point withdrawn abstracts can either be overwritten by “WITHDRAWN”, or deleted so that only the authorship and title remains followed by a blank space containing the word “WITHDRAWN”.  The latter is the preferable option since it penalizes the author for the late withdrawal.

Recommended practice ca. late April-early May is to request GAC® HQ to send out an auto-generated E–mail to all presenters who have not registered, reminding them to register.  This will often reveal those who have no intention of attending.


REGISTRATION

 

Registration generally begins around March 1st of the year of the meeting and follows distribution of the Final Notice.  The trend is to encourage maximum use of the web-site for on-line registration (for the 2004 and 2005 meetings ~ 90% of registrations were completed using the Registration website); however, faxed- or mailed-in registrations will continue to be an important part of the process for the foreseeable future.  It is normal practice to offer a discount to those registering prior to a certain date.  Registration fees must be approved by GAC® and MAC councils in the fall of the year preceding the meeting.

Critical Time-Lines:


Fall, year before meeting  LOC applies for a business number from Canada Customs and Revenue Agency.

February - year of meeting.  The look-up tables in the Registration database must be updated for the upcoming meeting.  The LOC must submit final fees and short descriptions for Registration Categories, Field Trips, Short Courses, Workshops, Social Events and Guest Events.  All items must also be translated into French. 

The system is then tested through a test site and connected to the LOC web site. It is critical to test that all aspects of registration still work after connection. Some university networks may interfere with or prevent transfer of data between the HQ and LOC sites.

Late February – early March.  The Final Notice is distributed by mail.

Early March.  Registration system goes on-line and prepares to accept web, fax and mail submissions.

Mid – April.  Early registration ends, as does field trip and short course registration. Decision made as to whether Short Courses and/or Field Trips will proceed

Mid – Late April.  E-mail notices of cancelled events are sent out to affected registrants.

The following events take place in close succession generally in late April to mid-May, depending upon the date of the meeting:

Four to three weeks prior to meeting.  Cancellation deadline for registration – no refunds issued after this time.  Reminders are sent to unregistered presenters.

Two weeks prior to meeting.  Pre-registration by web site, mail and fax ends.  Name badges, and social/guest event tickets together with spare name badge and  ticket forms for on-site use are printed by GAC® HQ and shipped to the meeting site.

Two to three days prior to meeting. Registration committee packs registration kits; HQ registration supervisor arrives and sets up.

Mid – late May.  Start of meeting and on-site registration. When meeting registration opens, the LOC Registration Chair and committee distribute registration kits to pre-registered delegates.

Registration forms are available for on-site delegates. Facilities, a table, chair, pens etc., are provided in the registration area for on site registrants to complete the registration form before proceeding to the HQ Registration Supervisor to complete, i.e. pay, the registration process.

E-commerce Banking Links

The ability to provide secure handling of credit card transactions is an essential component of the on-line registration system.  Registrants have three main choices for payment: mail-in payment by cheque or money order; credit card payment either by fax, mail or e-commerce; and billing as an account receivable.

Credit card transactions may be handled in two ways.  1) The registrant may use the on-line system to make payment.  In this system the credit card transaction is automatically handed-off to a secure site maintained by the bank or its e-commerce agent.  The bank then e-mails confirmation of the transaction to the registrant and the registration office.  In this case, the registration staff does not handle credit card data.  2) The registrant registers on-line, or by another method, and makes payment by faxing- or mailing-in a credit card number.  The Registration Supervisor then enters the number into a point-of-sale (POS) terminal for deposit to the conference bank account.

GAC® presently banks with CIBC in St. John’s, Newfoundland and credit card services are provided through CIBC’s “Merchant’s Edge” card services, a separate account being maintained for annual conferences.  Links to this service are generally made through a third-party e-commerce provider, the current one being MiraPay (http://www.mirapay.com/) operated by Eigen Development Ltd.  The Merchant’s Edge service makes Visa and MasterCard available through one agency.  All sales from any of these accounts are deposited in the conference bank account in St. John’s.  Allowance for credit card transaction fees has to be built into the GAC® HQ registration budget.  Fees charged by Visa are 2%, and by MasterCard, 3.25%.

When a registrant pays on line through use of a credit card, the registrant receives an E-mail confirmation of acceptance from MiraPay.  GAC® HQ also receives automatic confirmation of the transaction, which is recorded in the Access database.

Taxes and the Canada Customs and Revenue Business Number

GAC®/MAC annual meetings have to pay and charge federal Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Provincial Sales Tax (PST), or Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) in the Atlantic Provinces, on most of their activities.  For this reason, the database is configured to record the tax components of all transactions.  In order to provide a ready breakout of taxes for accounting and payment purposes, the cost for any taxable item is entered as the base (pre-tax) cost and the tax component.  The tax component comprises either the HST, or combined GST and PST.  Normally the PST component must be calculated after the addition of GST but local rules should be followed.  The tax calculation has to be done manually prior to entry in a look-up table.  Assign fees so that the base cost plus tax is a round number.

It is essential that each LOC obtain a business number from Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (and if necessary with provincial finance departments) as early as possible.  The number is displayed on receipts and may, in some cases, allow delegates or their employers to claim the GST component back.  It is not transferable to future meetings. GAC® is able to claim back the GST on some items so careful record keeping of tax components is essential.

The Final Notice

The main purpose of this is to draw attention to the conference and to announce that registration is open.  In the past it has been a substantial booklet, however, current practice is to reduce the size to a flyer or pamphlet and to place as much information as possible on the LOC web site. 

Accommodation

The registration database is not designed to handle accommodation requests.  The Final Notice contains references to the conference website where links to accommodation listings (University residence, local hotels, etc.) can be found.

Exhibitor Registration

The registration database has a category for exhibitors but is not currently set up to handle on-line exhibitor registrations, though this may change at a future date.  The LOC generally sends potential exhibitors a faxable form, which they can use to book their booth and purchase social and guest event tickets.  Exhibitors do not pay registration fees and are normally allowed to attend social and guest events, but not the technical sessions, field trips or short courses.  Exhibitors are entered in the database under the category “exhibitors”.  The normal practice at meetings is to offer exhibitors one free, full registration per booth.  In this case, the information for that person needs to be entered into the registration database, also using the registration category “exhibitor”, but in this case giving the person access to all meeting events.  There is usually a limit (2 to 4, including any free registrations) to the number of persons that can be registered in association with a booth.

It is essential that all exhibitor registration information be copied to the Registration Supervisor.

A sample of an exhibitor information and registration form that can be used by the LOC is given in Appendix 2B.

Setting Fees

Conference fees can be entered in the database following confirmation of the meeting budget and fee structure at the fall meeting of GAC® and MAC councils (where the LOC typically presents its budget for approval).  The fees are normally divided into Early and Late, with the changeover date being around mid-April.  The early fees are set at a lower level in order to encourage an earlier registration.  The database will automatically switch to the late fee after the end of early registration. Halifax 05 has experimented, reasonably successfully,  with a third and higher fee category for on-site registration; the intent being to encourage on-line registration and reduce on-site work.  Generally, some or all of the following registration categories are used:

GAC®/MAC members (discounted rate)
GAC®/MAC student members

Non-member student
Non-member
Retired/Unemployed member

Retired/Unemployed non-member
One-day member
One-day non-member
Accompanying Guest
Complimentary student
Complimentary General
Complimentary Press
Exhibitor

Fees are also needed for field trips, short courses, workshops, social and luncheon events and guest events.  Fees must include applicable GST/PST or HST and follow local rules for calculation.  The tax calculation for the component of the fees must also be given to the Registration Supervisor for entry into the database.  Registration cannot open until all fees are finalized.  Field Trips generally prove the most difficult to finalize because of the more complex logistics.

Complimentary registrations or event-bookings cannot be made on-line.  They have to be faxed to the Registration Office.

With regard to student fees, discounts are normally provided to students who are members of GAC®, MAC or other sponsoring societies.  Non-member students  receive a significantly lesser discount.  Students can join GAC® or MAC very cheaply by either acquiring an on-line application form from the society websites ( http://www.gac.ca/   http://www.mineralogicalassociation.ca/ ), or at the on-site booths of these associations in the exhibition hall.

On-Line Registration Procedures

The Registration site is part of the same database housing the Abstract submission system and is linked to the Internet using similar ASP protocols.  Reconfiguration is done through lookup tables in both English and French.  The registration site is linked seamlessly to the LOC web site in the same manner as for abstract submission.  When a registrant clicks on “registration” on the LOC site he/she is linked to the GAC® HQ registration web site in St. John’s.  The opening page provides options for both abstract submission and registration.  Those who have already been given a password from their abstract submission may use this to avoid having to enter their personal details again, however, use of the password is not essential.  From the registration button, the delegate is taken to the registration site.  Registration from here on is a three-step process:

Step 1 asks for personal data (by-passed if password is used)

Step 2 allows the delegate to purchase registration, field trips, social events etc., and arrive at a final purchase list

Step 3 provides options for payment; either by using a credit card, or by using a downloaded form that can be faxed or mailed in with either a credit card number, or (by mail) a cheque.  For on-line payments, the delegate is transferred to the CIBC secure banking site.

Following acceptance of payment (if the on-line payment option is used), delegates will see a final “Your Transaction was Successful” screen also giving a registration ID number and a password (if not already issued).

Acknowledgement of Registration

Once payment has been received, the Registration Supervisor sends an auto-generated E-mail acknowledgement, a sample of which is shown in Appendix 2C.  This also reminds delegates of the cancellation deadline.

Registration Problems

Some delegates may abort their submission before the payment stage, in which case a partial registration will be posted.  In some cases (e.g. where a person has obviously been testing the site) these can be deleted, but in others they may have to be followed up by e-mail.  A registration is only considered final when payment has been received by the Registration Supervisor.  Because many payments are made by fax or mail, there can be a delay before registrations are confirmed.

Fax- or Mail-in Registrations

A downloadable registration form will be accessible from the registration site.  This is downloaded, completed and mailed or faxed in for registration, in which case the Registration Supervisor manually enters the information into the database.  Since supervisor time = money, it is advisable to encourage maximum use of on-line registration.

Separate Registration for Short Courses, Workshops and Field Trips

 

Those attending short courses, workshops and field trips are encouraged to also register for the meeting. However, recent practice has been to permit delegates to not register for the meeting particularly in cases where this may allow an otherwise undersubscribed event to proceed. Those who wish to avail of this benefit must register for their course, trip etc. by fax using the downloadable registration form. They cannot register on-line. For non-meeting registrants wishing to participate in Short Courses, Field Trips and Workshops a non-refundable handling fee will be charged in addition to the course fee to cover administrative costs.

It is expected that organizers of short courses, workshops, or field trips will tie these functions directly to symposia or special sessions in the technical program of the conference.

Complimentary Registrations and Events

There will be individuals to whom the LOC wishes to award complimentary registration or free access to functions.  This cannot be done on-line; therefore, all complimentary registrations, or requests for free access to functions, should be faxed from the LOC to the Registration Supervisor.  It is important to register all complimentary delegates because the numbers will be used in estimating the numbers of meals, seats etc. required at functions.

Additional Purchases, Cancellations and Refunds

A delegate who has already registered may re-enter the site using his/her password and make additional purchases.  Any cancellations, however, have to be made in writing (E-mail is permitted) to the Registration Supervisor prior to the cancellation deadline.  The supervisor will then issue refunds.  In the case of partial cancellations, the cost is fully refunded, but in the case of full cancellations a fee of $50 is withheld.

Cancellations by the LOC

Following the early registration deadline, it is common for the LOC to have to cancel short courses, field trips, workshops, etc. that are under-subscribed.  Notifications of such cancellations should be sent out by the LOC and copied to the Registration Supervisor and any sponsors as soon as possible.  The Registration Supervisor, once notified, will issue full refunds for these events.

Reviewing the Registration Database via the Web

As for the abstract database, a password controlled web site is available for viewing the registration information. The LOC Registration Chair is provided with password access to registration database to monitor registrations as the meeting dates approaches. This is extremely useful for meeting and event organizers who need continuous updates regarding registration in their particular area of interest.  Categories covered include Registration, Field Trips, Short Courses, Workshops, Social Events and Guest Events.  The details of the procedure are given in Appendix 2D.

ON-SITE REGISTRATION

The Registration Area

The registration area contains both pre-registration and on-site registration desks and should be planned with an eye to eliminating bottlenecks and speeding up the process.  Are signs easily read and understood?  Directions cannot be too simple.  The delegate, no matter how intelligent, is busy, tired, and preoccupied with getting settled.  Any information he/she has to digest must be readily understood at one quick glance.  If signs are clear, there will be many less questions for registration staff to cope with.

 

The registration area should be set up so that the whole process is one continuing line.  Provide space for selling tickets for field trips, social functions, etc.  Arrange with the hotel or university for all counters, tables, etc. necessary for use in the registration area.

 

The Pre-Registration Desk
This will normally contain:

1.   Personal envelopes, containing the registrant’s name badge-receipt and tickets, arranged in alphabetical order.  The Registration Supervisor prints name badge-receipts and social event tickets directly from the database, packs them into personalized envelopes, then ships them to the meeting site.  Distribution at the meeting is an LOC responsibility.  Additional badges and tickets will also be shipped for use on-site.

2.   Generic registration bags containing Program and Abstract volumes plus promotional materials etc.  These are entirely an LOC responsibility.  The bags will need to be packed a day or two before the meeting and then be boxed and shipped to the meeting site (Warning – this amounts to a sizable amount of material requiring professional moving!)

The On-Site Registration Desk
On-site can be handled in two ways depending upon the size of anticipated on-site registration:

1.   In excess of 100.  In this case it is best if a local organization, such as a university conference service, is contracted by the LOC to handle the matter.  The Registration Supervisor will be available at the desk to assist with the inevitable queries concerning pre-registrations.  The accounts for on-site registration should be maintained separately until the meeting is over.  At that point they can either be handled by the LOC or transferred to the HQ Registration Office for merger with the rest of the registration account.  The organization conducting the on-site registration should liaise with the Registration Supervisor well before the meeting in order to coordinate logistics.

2.   Less than 100.  In this case the duties can be handled by the HQ Registration Supervisor with the assistance of two to three local volunteers.  The Supervisor will provide a laptop computer equipped with Access database software, and a Point-of-Sale credit card terminal.  It is essential that the Registration Supervisor not be burdened with other duties such as sales of other items, eg. parking permits, lunch vouchers, t-shirts, etc. It is vital to have at least  one additional computer with two volunteer operators. The Supervisor will train the volunteer staff on the database software in the days before the meeting.

The software used for on-line registration is not well suited to the demands of on-site registration where speed of data entry is vital. Accordingly, a simplified registration form that uses MS Word is available (see appendix X). This captures data essential for the registrant’s name badge and enables it to be printed rapidly. The information can be transferred to the registration database at a later date if required.

In both cases, the Registration Supervisor will need electrical power (computer + printer) and telephone service (POS terminal).

Additional points on registration area:

·         Various desks (Registration, Accommodation, etc.) must be clearly marked.

·         It is preferable to have one person in charge of the registration area at all times, with this individual knowledgeable about all facets of the meeting.

·         Committee chairs must check with the registration area on a regular basis during the course of the meeting.

·         Many delegates will arrive late expecting accommodation.  Be certain this can be handled.

·         A bulletin board is essential for late announcements of meetings, change of meeting locations, and personal messages for delegates.  This should be centrally located in registration area.

·         A major concern for on-site registration is processing delegates quickly and efficiently.  Be sure to have:

o        A central area large enough to accommodate all desks and line-ups with ease, and also to act as a meeting place for delegates.  Ideally, it should be adjacent to the icebreaker area and the exhibition hall.

o        Good sign-posting and labelling

o        Back-up printers and computers in case of technical failure

o        Computer expertise on hand in case of crashes or software problems

·         Desk telephones and/or cell phones for critical personnel- everyone should have a call list.  Committee chairs should be on constant call.

·         A staffing roster

·         Separate desk for social and guest event ticket sales.

·         Provision for issuing parking directions and permits.

·         An area for accompanying guests to meet prior to their trips – preferably with coffee and tea.

·         A SECURE place for delegates to leave their luggage on the last day of the meeting.

·         Consider distinguishing special clothing or uniform for registration staff.

·         Credit card and SECURE cash handling facilities.

A potential bottleneck is the on-site desk. Registration can be speeded up by having delegates fill out paper copies (or a simplified equivalent) of the registration form before they get to the desk.  The desk attendant then only has to fill in enough data to generate a name badge and receipt. The remaining information can be entered later.  The desk must also be equipped to handle credit card payments – preferably by POS terminal. Arrangements to secure a terminal and to set up an account must be made several weeks ahead of the meeting.  Provision for tallying cash and receipts at each day’s end must also be made.  Cash should be deposited a soon as possible.

With respect to social and guest event ticket sales, it is important to keep close control over spare tickets and also to monitor sales numbers so that events are not unintentionally oversold. Continuous liaison with the social chair and catering staff is required.



Policy Decisions

A decision-making staff member should be on duty at all times during registration.  There is nothing more aggravating to a delegate than to ask a simple question nobody can answer satisfactorily.  It's too time consuming to expect others in line to wait until someone is found to resolve a problem. There should be a clear understanding with registration personnel on meals and parking fees.  If complimentary tickets are involved, everyone should know how they will be handled.

 

Refunds for 'no-shows' are at the discretion of the LOC, but proportionate shares of fixed costs for bus rentals, guaranteed food functions, etc. should be retained.

 

The Registration Committee should set up ground rules for handling problems, deciding policies in advance, and ensuring that everyone knows the correct procedure for such problems as the following:

·         Delegate wants you to bill his company directly.

·         Delegate wants to cash a check for more than the amount he owes.

·         Someone says he is entitled to a press pass.

·         Delegates carrying only US or other currencies.  Usually we take US dollars at an established conversion rate (check rate each day) but for other currencies the delegate is usually referred to the nearest bank that will provide exchange.

·         Delegates who have not arranged accommodation and think it is your responsibility

·         Delegates wanting refunds (we do not refund registration fees but some function costs may be refunded at LOC discretion)

·         Delegates who think they should get a member discount (but are not GAC® or MAC members), or who expect complimentary registration (e.g. an invited speaker)

·         Delegates who say they have registered but for whom there is no record

·         Delegates who want their employers to be billed for their registration

·         Delegates wishing to pay by personal cheque

·         Delegates who have lost their badges or programs

·         Student delegates who want to acquire membership in GAC® or MAC to get the discount rate (refer to the GAC® & MAC desks if open)

It is essential therefore that an individual, the LOC Chair or Registration Chair, be present in the Registration area who is empowered to make rapid decisions on these and similar matters

Hold a training session ahead of the start of registration and practice by registering the meeting volunteers.

The registration desks must typically be manned from 12:00 noon to 9:00 pm on the opening day (particularly during the evening icebreaker reception) and then from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm on the following days for the duration of the meeting.  The peak period, when all staff will need to be on duty, will be the afternoon and evening of the opening day, and the following morning.

Exhibitor Registration

It is the LOC’s responsibility to ensure that all exhibitor names are given to the Registration Supervisor in advance of the meeting for inclusion in the database.  This is essential if they are to be issued name badges, social event tickets etc.  Exhibitors can then pick up their materials from the pre-registration desk.

Name Badges, Receipts and Tickets

The database is configured to produce a combined name badge/receipt (Appendix 2E) printed on custom perforated stock. The name badge carries the conference logo in colour plus the delegate’s name and affiliation, and is designed to fit a 4 x 5 inch, clear plastic badge holder.  Accompanying guest badges are printed next to those of the delegates whom they are accompanying.  The social and guest event tickets are printed in monochrome on commercial perforated stock, eight to a page.

If the LOC wishes to print its own tickets it must notify the HQ Registration Supervisor, at least three weeks in advance of the meeting, otherwise registrants may be issued two sets of tickets.

Accounting and Audit Procedures

The registration database can export a financial report for use by the LOC finance committee in their accounting procedures.  This report can be imported into most accounting software packages (e.g. Simply Accounting).  The overall objective should be to produce a traceable and auditable financial trail.  The Access database has been designed to do this in conformity with generally accepted accounting standards.  The database records each financial action as a separate transaction, thus it is possible to list all of the transactions made by an individual.  It is difficult (and expensive!) to change the database, therefore, the LOC accountants should be made familiar with the financial transaction methods built into the database well in advance of the registration period.  In the fall following the conference, the GAC® HQ auditor will perform an audit of the registration accounts.  This will then be passed to the LOC for use in the overall audit of the meeting.  On-site registration funds that remain with the LOC will not be included in the HQ registration audit.
ACCOMMODATION

 

The University-Centred Meeting

Many GAC®/MAC meetings are held on a university campus (generally this venue keeps costs down).  This greatly simplifies accommodation of delegates through the use of university residences.  Most universities do not require a specific number of rooms to be reserved, and there is thus considerable leeway for last-minute arrivals.  All agreements with the university-housing people regarding penalties for no shows, release of rooms, etc. should be in writing.

 

Many universities have their own conference  service units. These can usually  provide a variety of services ranging from complete conference management to assistance with specific services such as registration or social events.

 

Some hotel/motel accommodation is also bound to be required.  If this is not formally arranged, a list of hotels/motels can be sent to the delegates requesting them to make their own arrangements directly.

 

Remember that pre- and post-meeting field trip delegates usually require an extra night's accommodation.  Clear and simple maps are required for delegates to find their way from meeting rooms to residences, social functions, etc.  Use plenty of signs.

 

The Hotel or Convention Centre  Meeting

After a definite booking has been made for dates and space for your meeting, the LOC must provide both hotel executive and the convention bureau with complete details regarding expected attendance, rooms required in the past, and the usual arrival and departure pattern of members who will attend.  The hotel/convention centre management then familiarize themselves with the past-meeting history of your group and will confirm (or not) that they can provide adequate rooms, meeting and exhibit space, and the facilities, equipment, and services needed.  It is important to obtain specific commitments from hotels covering both type and number of accommodations, and duration of time for which they will be available. Specify each type of accommodation:  single, double, twin, suite (sleeping or hospitality).  The hotel should provide rates for the types of accommodations requested, and for specific dates through which these rates will apply.  If the booking is made several years in advance, find out when the hotel will guarantee the rates and times.

 

Obviously, there are reasons why some of the accommodations reserved may not be needed or used.  Reach a clear understanding with the hotel (in writing) on a cut-off date for holding rooms.  All the planning by the LOC, the hotel executive, and the convention bureau, will fall flat unless all three understand the arrangements in detail.  Stick to the agreement with the hotel, and insist that they stick to theirs.  Complete, honest, and continuing communications by all concerned are vital.

 

Many hotels will provide complimentary rooms or suites for staff and officers during the meeting. This is usually a negotiable item based on factors such as total number of rooms used, time of year, days of the week, etc.  If there are priorities on which to base room assignments, provide the hotel with the names of these people.  For example, the LOC might want officers, speakers, guests, exhibitors, etc. to receive special attention.

 

Convention hotels will also generally  waive or discount the cost of meeting rooms, provided that sleeping room sales reach a target level. This has to be negotiated in advance. Penalty costs will be imposed if bedroom sales do not meet their target, therefore, great care must be taken to ensure  that possible additional costs are covered in the budget and that overly optimistic estimates of room sales are avoided.

 

It is a good idea to have a small block of rooms at the headquarters hotel 'in your pocket' to handle last minute VIP emergencies.  If this is necessary, ask the hotel to cut off room assignments to the group, leaving 3 to 5 rooms, for this purpose.

 

Check with the housing bureau to see if it provides the service of handling hotel reservations.  If it does, the LOC should take advantage of this service. Convention centres may also provide a similar service. Arrange for the daily processing of reservation requests for hotel and motel rooms.  If a room deposit is required, clearly state this information on the housing form.  Arrange to provide a block of low-cost rooms for students, if possible.  Ask the housing bureau for periodic status reports of reservations and assignments.  This can be handled either as an interim report system, or you can ask that carbon copies of each reservation and assignment be mailed directly to your housing chair.  If a housing bureau is used, establish whether a charge is involved, the names of persons in charge, and confirm a flow system of information to the LOC, the hotel executive, and the convention bureau representative.


TRANSPORTATION

 

Two areas are of concern here:  transportation to the city the meeting is to be held in, and transportation within that city to the meeting site, or from the meeting site to other attractions.  For the former, LOC's should obtain early on, the details of travel agreements that either GAC® or MAC, or other associations, have established with particular travel agencies. Any attempts to arrange separate travel deals with major airlines, as was commonplace before 1996, would likely jeopardize such agreements.

 

With respect to travel in the meeting city, the LOC will have to decide whether it will provide travel to and from a university-centred meeting site, and downtown hotels.  In some past meetings such a service lost heavily; in others it worked well, and helped to generate much good will among delegates.  If registrants prefer not to stay on campus, or at or near the Convention Hotel, do not worry about them.  Again, whether it is best for people to find their own way from the airport to the meeting site will obviously vary from city to city.  If such transportation is provided (e.g. a shuttle bus service run on the day when most delegates are arriving or leaving), it will be necessary to have prominently displayed signs indicating pick-up meeting place, schedules, etc.


EXHIBITS

 

General

Exhibits can be a major source of revenue: A good exhibition also adds variety to the program and offers a refuge for the weary delegate.  Careful thought and planning is thus required, especially when dealing with industrial exhibitors.  Distributors of microscopes, lab and field equipment, mineral specimens, and especially scientific publishers are usually keen to display their wares.  Consultant and other service firms, government agencies and other societies are also potential exhibitors.

 

Letters of invitation (carefully thought-out and professional in appearance -- see previous Annual meeting reports for examples) to potential exhibitors should be sent out as soon as the First Notice is available.  These should be addressed to past exhibitors as well as to potential new ones. 

 

The charges for exhibit space will vary, depending partly on the services provided and on the nature of the display.  Commercial exhibitors obviously pay highest rates, universities and societies lower. Check past meeting Final Reports to determine appropriate exhibitor fees. Commercial exhibitors should be told that payment in advance is required to guarantee display space.  Collecting fees after the meeting may prove difficult  or impossible .

 

Complimentary prime exhibit space should be made available to GAC®, MAC and to the LOC of the upcoming GAC®/MAC.  Complimentary exhibit space should, if requested, be made available to any other organizations with which GAC®/MAC have reciprocal exhibiting agreements, e.g. CSPG or GSA.  Please consult with both GAC® and MAC headquarters.

 

Student assistants to help in setting up and manning these booths will be much appreciated.  Establish policy at the outset regarding free space, and space provided at reduced fees (for educational institutions?).  In such cases, the LOC may wish to indicate in its final report the cash value of free display space provided.

 

It is essential that all exhibitors be close together and as near to the centre of activities as possible. For example, exhibits and posters could be placed in the same space, if at all possible. They should be well advertised prior to and during the meeting, and delegates should be encouraged by every means possible to visit the exhibits.  A good idea may be to plan a social event, such as the opening 'icebreaker', on or near the exhibits area (as long as the exhibits are all in place, of course).  If at all possible, this area should include a bar and/or snack outlet.  Because of the revenue that exhibitors generate, it is important that we encourage as many as possible to return in subsequent years, so every possible effort should be made to maximize traffic through the exhibits.

 

Exhibitor Information and kit

This should be available on the LOC web  site and include a floor plan showing the exhibit area and the layout of booths, along with individual booth dimensions, and numbers of booths.  Information  on costs and how to register should also be provided. 

 

The LOC will normally need to provide for each booth a table, at least one chair, lighting access, a 'bulletin' or display board of some sort, drapery, and a name card.  However, many exhibitors will bring their own displays or wish to rent special equipment.  In the case of hotel-based meetings, the hotel may supply these, or it may be necessary to use the services of a display contractor.  An electrical service contractor also may be needed.  Letters of agreement should be obtained if commercial services are used, outlining services and equipment to be provided and total costs.  It should be stated that admittance to the meeting exhibit area will be by badge only.  This is considered to be in the best interests of the exhibitors.

 

Exhibitor registration

It has been the practice at some meetings to offer full complimentary registration to one booth delegate. Other delegates are given access to social and guest events but not the technical program. An exhibitor  registration form should be provided,  preferably as a download. These should be collected by the LOC Exhibits Chair and sent to the HQ Registration Supervisor so that badges and tickets can be issued. Exhibitors cannot as yet register online. 

 

List of Exhibitors

The Exhibits Committee Chair should provide an alphabetical list of exhibitors for possible inclusion on the conference website, with links to the exhibitors websites highlighted. 

 

Following the meeting, the GAC® Program Committee should be provided with a list of names, addresses, and contracts of all exhibitors for use in planning the following year's meeting.  These names and addresses should also appear as an appendix to the final report on the Annual Meeting.

 


FIELD TRIPS

 

Policy Guidelines

SAFE and efficiently run field trips are amongst the most important aspects of an AGM.  Toward this end, an extensive Safety Policy is provided (Appendix 5).  It is the responsibility of the Chair of the Field Trips committee to ensure that the Safety Policy is implemented and carried out.  Safety is of utmost importance.

 

Field trips provide an opportunity, especially for registrants coming from a distance, to learn by first-hand inspection under authoritative guidance something of the salient features of the geology of the area.  They have been among the most successful functions of GAC®/MAC Annual Meetings.  These trips may be held pre-meeting, post-meeting, or, less commonly, during the meeting.  An early and important duty of the Field Trip Committee is to determine, ideally about 3 years before the meeting, but not less than 1 year before, the field trips that are to be offered, their costs, duration, dates and leaders.

 

For most trips, the objectives of the trip will be directly related to one of the themes of the meeting.  There may also be trips not directly related to major conference themes, but dealing with areas of unique geological interest.  Each trip will have a ‘working group’ consisting of the trip leader(s), whose prime responsibility will be the technical planning, and assistant(s) or co-leader(s) who is responsible for logistics.  In consultation with the Field Trip Chair, each working group will develop its own trip plan, with regard to objectives, itinerary (including starting and finishing point and total kilometres), and scheduling.  The maximum and minimum number of participants should be calculated for an economic break-even at a realistic cost per person.  Normally each trip is costed to break even at 75 percent capacity, with the plan to cancel all trips that fail to reach 60 percent.

 

The working group must also review available field guides, any new requirements provided by the Field Trip Committee , and make a cost estimate based on a planned budget.  For cost estimates, the working group for each trip should obtain quotations on bus and transportation charters, and establish meal and accommodation rates at selected overnight stops.  The Field Trip Chair will provide lists of trip registrants, fees paid and cancellations.  As regards the publication of field guides and their subsequent sales, the LOC should be consulted.

 

Some thought should be given as to who should be accepted on field trips.  On some past occasions, field trips were heavily booked, well in advance of deadlines, by company geologists.  Academics (both students and professors) who were unable to book so far in advance, owing to uncertainty of funds, etc. lost out on many trips.  Consideration may thus be given to setting limits on trip participants, based on their interests, qualifications, or employment.  CSPG has on occasion given preference to 'out-of-town' people on some of its popular trips, with the intention of running the trip again at a later date for the local people.  However, no specific guidelines are offered here, as this is an LOC responsibility, but organizers should be aware of this potential problem and the hard feelings that may result.

 

The GAC® now has a comprehensive liability insurance policy that covers GAC® members on Annual Meeting field trips.  Details can be obtained from the GAC® Secretary-Treasurer.  The MAC also carries corporate liability coverage.  However, GAC® does not have insurance to cover the use of helicopters or fixed wing aircraft.  Therefore, organizers of field trips involving the use of helicopters and planes are required to procure their own insurance, and include the cost in the budget for the field trip. Note that the cost of such insurance may be prohibitive. Contact GAC® Headquarters with your trip information well in advance of the field trip in order to insure that all the required travel arrangements are covered by the GAC®’s insurance policy.

 

Field Trip Budgets

A typical field trip budget may follow this format:

1.  Trip Title

2.  Transportation

Buses (Km & Days)

Cars (Km & Days)

Trucks (Km & Days)

3.  Trip Preparation (including guidebook)

4.  Expenses for Leaders

5.  Food (generally lunch and snacks) (Participants x Days x Per Diem)

6.  Accommodation (Participants x Days x Per Diem)

7.  Contingency (10%)

8.  Cost per Participant

 

All field trips should be planned on a self-supporting basis.  The registration cost for each trip should be set to include all applicable expenses in the approved budget of the Field Trip Committee.  Where chartered buses are used, projected transportation expenses normally are based on two-thirds occupancy, and should include any tolls, parking fees, taxes, source fees such as a fee for pickup at hotels or airports, and a gratuity for the driver.  Any special publicity, e.g. printing and mailing of special flyers or field trip write-ups, should be budgeted for.  Public address equipment (e.g. bull horns) may have to be rented.  Expenses incurred in planning (e.g. in constructing road logs, making motel arrangements) might have to be built into the cost of a trip, if the employers of the trip leaders do not normally fund this type of activity.  Guidebook costs should be included in the field trip budget.

 

The question of whether field trip registrants effectively pay the cost of guidebook preparation, including extra copies for subsequent sale by the LOC is one for local decision.  Adopting this method means that the field trips can create a ‘deferred legacy’ to help fund local activities for several years afterwards.  In any event, the cost for printing field trip guides must be included in the budget.

 

Final Arrangements

Where prepayment of registration fees is adequate to guarantee a trip’s financial solvency, all necessary arrangements for the trip should be finalized.  If transportation and other arrangements are such that additional registrants can be accommodated without upsetting the trip’s financial stability, additional registrations may be accepted at the Field Trips Information Desk in the Annual Meeting registration area.  If overnight accommodations at locations along the route have been made in advance, be sure to double check these arrangements and give final guarantees at least 24 hours in advance of your arrival at the site.

 

Unexpectedly bad weather may force cancellation of one or more field trips at the last minute.  The committee should formulate appropriate policies to be followed in this eventuality (notification, substitute programs, refunds, etc.)

 

As buses are preparing to load for departure on each field trip, the field trip leaders should be on hand to see that everything runs smoothly and to assist in checking tickets, no-shows, stand-by registrations, last-minute sales of guidebooks, public-address equipment or bull horns, and location of any refreshments or box lunches.

 

Cancellation of Field Trips and Refunds

Where the payment of pre-registration fees is not sufficient to cover the expenses of a scheduled trip, the trip should be cancelled. Generally this is done in mid to late April following the close of early registration. Registrants should be given the opportunity to register for one of the other field trips if space allows, but if they decide not to then all fees should be promptly refunded. The LOC should NOT agree to cover the expenses already incurred by a potential participant, e.g. if they have booked their air transportation far in advance. The problem of refunds of field trip fees to delegates who cancel after the deadline can be a very sensitive one, and a definite statement of policy is necessary to provide some ‘muscle’ for the LOC when needed.  One way to handle refunds is as follows:  Up to the cut-off date for field trip registration (which should be about 4 weeks before the meeting), promptly refund full field trip registration fees upon written request accompanied by the return of any field trip tickets issued.  After the cut-off date for field trip registration, promptly refund only a predetermined portion of the field trip registration fees, upon written request.  Refunds to field trip ‘no-shows’ are not recommended, except under unusual circumstances.  This fact should be clearly stated in the Second Notice and on the conference website.

 

To a large extent, the specifics as to how refunds are to be handled will rest with the LOC.  However, the policies adopted must appear on all field trip announcements and field trip registration forms.  A measure of flexibility and discretion on the part of the LOC should be retained. 

 

Field Trip Guidebooks

Publication and distribution of guidebooks for field trips held in conjunction with Annual Meetings are the responsibility of the LOC.  In general, the best plan is to keep them simple and inexpensive (photo-offset, simple covers, plastic cerlox binding).  Plasticized or plastic covers are great for adverse weather conditions.

 

Deadline for receipt of guidebook copy from trip leaders is at the discretion of the Field Trip Committee, however this should be well in advance of the meeting to allow sufficient time for reproduction.  Do not send guidebooks out to trip participants through the mail; let the leaders distribute these during the trip or during the meeting in the case of post-meeting trips.

 

Copyright to field trip guidebooks arising from the Annual Meeting shall rest with the sponsoring organizations, unless a proposal from the LOC to do otherwise for that meeting is accepted by the sponsoring organizations.  Such acceptance shall not be unreasonably withheld.  Identity of the copyright holder(s) shall appear appropriately in each publication, so as to facilitate approaches by other publishers seeking permission to reprint material.

 

It is important that guidebooks contain the same kind of front matter as other books.  Because these are often the only source of detailed information on an area, the LOC has a special responsibility to make sure that they are clearly identifiable and available.  Guidebook information should include:

1.      Name, date, and place of the national meeting.

2.      The identification of the Sponsoring association (GAC® or MAC).  Where a Division or Section is responsible for sponsoring a field trip, they too should be identified.

2.   Guidebook title and field trip number.  If the title is not descriptive, a short statement about the scope of the trip should be added.

3.   Publisher, author(s), editor(s), copyright.

4.   Post-meeting availability, including full name and address of publisher, terms of purchase, and name of organization or person to whom cheques are to be made payable.

 

If there will be no copies for sale to other than field trip participants, LOCs should list where copies may be borrowed on inter-library loans.  If a copying service is available, list full particulars.  Despite the numerous enquiries and orders for guidebooks received by GAC® head office after every Annual Meeting, it is clear GAC® and MAC policy not to stock guidebooks for sale, and all enquiries are referred to the appropriate LOC.

 

The LOC can anticipate modest sales to libraries, geology departments, and individuals, especially if the guide is more than just a simple road log and has been fully described in the Program volume.  This may be so even for field trips which are cancelled.  The tendency in recent years has been to underestimate the demand for guides.  On the other hand, overestimating post-meeting sales can increase printing costs considerably.

 

Perhaps the best approach is to prepare the guidebooks in such a way that they can be quickly and cheaply reprinted.  Several organizing committees published for sale a separate book that included all of the field trip guides for their meeting.

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES

The association (GAC® or MAC) responsible for sponsoring a field trip should be clearly identified in all propaganda (all circulars and the AGM final program) advertising the field trip.

 

The LOC is responsible for providing GAC® with hard copies of all the field guide books resulting from an AGM.  These should be forwarded to GAC® Headquarters (St. John’s) or provided to GAC® staff during the AGM.

In addition GAC® HQ should be advised where copies of each field trip guidebook may be purchased following the meeting.

The importance of running SAFE field trips cannot be overemphasized.  Everyone involved in the organization and running of a field trip is required to review the Safety Policy (Appendix 9) and implement the necessary precautions necessary to insure that field trip participants are not unnecessarily exposed to hazardous situations.

 


ACCOMPANYING MEMBERS PROGRAM

 

The program for accompanying members (spouses, children, lovers, just good friends) is the prerogative of the LOC.  In some locations, there may be many things to do on one's own, and all that may be required is information and local guidebooks.  In others, it may be useful to organize more activities.  In any case, remember that accompanying members these days are not necessarily all women, and that many people prefer to explore on their own.  Some useful guides may be found in the following extracts from a GSA meeting manual:

·  Plan the Accompanying Members Program as thoroughly as any other part of the convention.

·  Learn everything you can about your audience.

·  Consider budget first.

·  Estimate attendance.

·  Ask for contributions to the program from allied industries and exhibitors, and give contributors recognition.

·  Have a centrally located and well appointed hospitality suite.  This may be the most popular and useful aspect of the Accompanying Members Program.

·  Schedule at least one function outside the hotel or university campus.

·  Check for special group rates on different activities.

·  Have a host or hostess on all bus trips.

·  Create a specific arrival and departure schedule for trips.

·  Buy block tickets for theatre and concert tours because they guarantee good, inexpensive seats.

·  Have lectures that specifically apply to the audience.

·  Bring in lecturers on today's social problems.

·  Allow time for a question and answer period after a lecture.

·  Coordinate promotion for the Accompanying Members Program with general meeting promotion.

·  Don't schedule anything after five o'clock.

·  Don't schedule many early morning meetings.

·  Don't exhaust people on tours.

·  Don't have any groups larger than 10 on house and garden tours.

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

General

If staff are available, it is preferable for one person to be in charge of each individual Special Event.  External organizations may be willing to sponsor specific social events, which may help the financial bottom line for the conference.  As for all other aspects of the meeting, the social functions budget must be made for different attendance estimates.  All events should be optional, although the Welcoming Reception usually brings in nearly everyone.

 

Additionally the LOC should arrange for a photographer to be available at social events throughout the meeting. This individual, an LOC member or a professional, serves to provide a photographic record of the meeting. The resulting photographs are then made available to GAC® and MAC, and other associations, for publication in communications to members and sponsors highlighting of the medalists and award winners from the meeting.

 

Icebreaker

This is generally held on the evening preceding the first day of the meeting between about 7:00 and 11:30 pm and is generally held in the exhibits hall or a suitable nearby area. A bar is provided (the LOC may wish to provide some complimentary drinks) and light snacks may also be served. There are no addresses or presentations. Musical entertainment may be provided but should not detract from the prime purpose of the icebreaker, which is to allow delegates to  renew contacts and talk. There is no charge for the event and the cost should be built into the meeting budget. Any major sponsors of the meeting should be prominently advertised at the event.

 

Luncheons

The GAC®, MAC and GAC® Mineral Deposits Division (MDD) luncheons are normally held on the first, second, and third days of the meeting.  The former is chaired by the GAC® President, and presentation of GAC® medals may be made.  Some awards may also be presented at the GAC® Business Meeting.  The award presentations deserve early and careful consideration; they should be discussed with GAC® and MAC presidents well in advance.  The GAC® luncheon is normally well attended.  The MAC and MDD luncheons are usually somewhat smaller than the GAC® luncheon. In organizing these two luncheons, the Social Chairman should communicate directly with the GAC®, MAC and MDD presidents at least 6 months in advance.  Some GAC® Sections and Divisions, and other sponsoring associations, may also wish to hold their own luncheons or social events, but they must be made aware of the timing of these three primary luncheons.

 

Presidential Addresses

This is an important event during which the spotlight/ limelight is on our national presidents and organizations.  Therefore, special consideration should be given to its place in the Annual Meeting.  Traditionally, the GAC® Presidential Address is scheduled for the first day of the Annual Meeting, and the MAC Presidential Address for the second day.  Approximately one hour should be set aside for the address, starting at 11:00 a.m.  This will allow time for an introduction, a 30-minute speech, a thank-you note, and for members to get to the formal luncheon that immediately follows.  Where possible, technical sessions should not be scheduled during the GAC® Presidential Address.  The MAC Presidential Address is normally presented in an appropriate technical session immediately preceding the luncheon.  Note that MAC presidents typically serve a two-year term, and so the Presidential Address occurs every 2nd year and at present is in odd years (2005, 2007, 2009, etc.).  The LOC may wish to thank or hear from other dignitaries during the course of the Annual Meeting.  This is to be done at some other venue, e.g. evening banquet, other than that scheduled for the GAC® Presidential Address.  Also the LOC Technical Program Chair should contact the MAC secretary well in advance of the meeting with respect to the Presidential Address.

 

President’s Reception

In recent years the GAC® has acknowledged the efforts of the many people who contribute to its success by hosting a modest reception.  The Local Organizing Committee and Past Presidents are among those honoured at this event.  Distinguished Service Awards and 50-year memberships are also presented. The responsibility for planning, however, rests with the LOC, in consultation with GAC® HQ.  The reception should be scheduled for 5:30 or 6:00 p.m., to follow the Outgoing Council meeting on the day prior to the start of the Annual Meeting.  Consult HQ with respect to the facilities needed.

 

Other Events

It is becoming customary for the LOC to plan at least one evening's entertainment with a local or regional flavour.  This normally comprises dinner and entertainment, and it is of course paid for by those who attend.  Note that most social functions are costly, and must receive special attention in planning.  If a break-even situation is planned, a slight surplus may ensue through liquor sales.

 

It is customary to run bars at several locations during the meeting; ideally one should be in, or close to, the exhibits area.  For all bars, it is recommended that professional bartenders be hired, and that ticket sales be at separate tables. The latter may depend on the licensing regulations at the meeting site.

 

Logan Paintings

The Logan Paintings, a set of sepia and colour paintings by Sir William Logan, are a part of our Canadian Geological Heritage, and were bequeathed to the GAC®.  These paintings are periodically displayed at AGMs – they were on display at the Wolfville ’92 and Waterloo ’75 AGMs.  Arrangements to have the paintings displayed at an AGM need to be negotiated with the GAC® and the GSC (who are currently responsible for the paintings).  It is suggested that the paintings be displayed at special meetings (i.e. Anniversary meetings; GeoCanada-style meetings).

 


PUBLICITY

 

Publicity requires at least one person working full-time, particularly during the meeting.  The general inexperience of most geologists with the many facets of effective publicity makes this a challenging task.  The local publicity person should work closely with the local Convention Bureau and the GAC® Communications Committee, and should maintain close communication with GAC® and MAC Councils.

 

Announcements of meeting dates, including symposia topics, should be sent to various national and international newsletters and journals, at least a year in advance. The conference website should be widely publicized in all communications.  Mining and oil trade journals and newspapers should be informed 8 to 10 months in advance.  This should be followed up on a regular basis (2-3 month interval) by updated information on the meeting and invited VIPs, etc.  The last letter should set the date for a news conference (when, where, etc.) to be held during the meeting.

 

Coverage by local and national news media is also to be arranged, especially involving local radio, television and newspaper people, and the local representatives of Canadian Press.  As these people are not normally knowledgeable in earth science, the level and nature of the information supplied will need to be somewhat different from that supplied to the trade journals.  It may be useful to set up a special press room where interviews can be held and reporters can prepare their releases.  Press kits containing background information on the meetings, award winners, incoming officers, aspects of local geological interest, etc. should be prepared and distributed to the press in advance and during the press conference.  A professional photographer should be hired to take photographs, such as of presentation of GAC® and MAC medals and awards, GAC®/MAC presidents, Local Organizing Committee, and social events.  A selection of the best photographs should be sent to Geolog and to the MAC Secretary.


The photographs of the LOC should be professionally displayed in an appropriate location close to either the registration area or the exhibits/poster session area. This allows conference participants to put a face to a name!

 

 

BUSINESS MEETINGS

 

Many groups wish to hold business sessions as a part of the Annual Meeting.  Scheduling these so as to avoid clashes is a considerable task, however, they must not conflict with the Annual General Meeting.  Consultation with the GAC® Associate Secretary-Treasurer and the MAC Secretary is essential here.

 

For the GAC®, there are meetings of the Executive, the outgoing and incoming Councils, Publications and other committees, the Annual Business Meeting of the Association, and the business sessions of most Divisions.  The Publications and Executive Committees usually meet on the morning and afternoon three days prior to the start of the main meeting, and the outgoing Council takes the full two days immediately prior to the Annual Meeting.

 

The MAC also schedules meetings of the Officers of MAC and the Council the day before the Annual Meeting begins, and the MAC business meeting later during the meeting.  There are also joint sessions of the MAC/GAC® executives and the GAC®/MAC Program Committees.  The Canadian Geoscience Council usually meets for a full day immediately after the close of the Annual Meeting.

 

The LOC should contact the GAC® Associate Secretary Treasurer and the MAC Executive Coordinator well in advance of the meeting to ensure that arrangements are complete for meetings and functions.

 

With the exceptions just mentioned, most of the business sessions require only one to two hours, and the LOC may be able to schedule these in the late afternoon or breakfast periods.  The LOC must consult early on with the various GAC®, MAC and other groups involved to determine their requirements for timing, space and other facilities (photocopier, data projector, coffee, lunch, etc.).  The final schedule of Business Meetings should be posted on the conference website and printed in the Program volume distributed at the meeting.

 

Planning of Business meetings should aim to avoid possible overlap with technical and social programs. Early planning and consultation with groups involved are greatly recommended.


 


SHORT COURSES and WORKSHOPS

 

One component of the Technical Program of each Annual Meeting is to offer participants and interested professionals the opportunity to attend a short course or workshop which may serve a variety of purposes.

 

Responsibilities

GAC® and MAC

Each sponsoring council will take on the role of identification, approval and financial responsibility for Short Courses and Workshops run at Annual Meetings and these courses/workshops shall be approved at the Joint Executive Meeting at least two years in advance of the meeting. In addition, each council will provide assistance with respect to publication of materials related to the course(s)/workshop(s) for which it is responsible.

 

Local Organizing Committee

The LOC serves solely in a coordination role for Short Courses and Workshops, to facilitate provision of facilities and provide a means of liaison between Short Courses and technical sessions.

 

Definitions

A Short Course is a training course of a short duration (normally one to three days) given by professional instructors to update or upgrade registrant skills, and should be considered professional development. The course format is variable and determined by individual short course organizers and approved by each respective council (GAC® or MAC) or other sponsoring society. Short Course preparation follows formal guidelines set by each council and are published as appendices in this Annual Meeting Guide.

 

Normal practice is for GAC® to offer up to two Short Courses and MAC one course at the annual meeting. Other sponsoring societies may also wish to offer Short Courses. Each sponsoring society is responsible for the organization and financial control of its own Short Courses. Persons wishing to propose Short Courses should make contact with the relevant society in accordance with its policies (but at least two years in advance of the meeting) and gain approval for the course. The LOC is also free to suggest Short Course ideas to the sponsoring societies. However, the chief role of the LOC is to provide facilities for the courses and to appoint a Short-Course Chair who shall be part of the LOC and act as coordinator and main point of liaison with the sponsoring societies.

 

Workshops are informal training or information-sharing sessions normally one day or less in duration and are part of the Annual Meeting. These may be organized by the LOC or one of the sponsoring societies. The LOC must provide facilities for the Workshop and the LOC Short Course chair shall act as the liaison with the Workshop organizer. Apart from this, the only requirement is that the Workshop cover its costs.

 

Participants of Short Courses and Workshops, held as part of the annual meeting are encouraged but not required to register for the meeting. In the case of non-meeting registrants, a non-refundable handling fee will be charged in addition to the course fee to cover LOC administrative costs.

The level of this fee will be determined annually by GAC® and MAC councils and applied equally to all Short Courses and Workshops. This fee must be approved by the LOC as part of its budget.

 

 

GAC® Sponsored Short Courses

Guidelines for GAC® sponsored short courses as part of the Annual Meeting can be found in Appendix 3.

 

MAC Sponsored Short Courses

Guidelines for MAC sponsored short courses as part of the Annual Meeting can be found in Appendix 4.

 

Other Societies Sponsored Short Courses

For Short Courses run under the auspices of other Annual Meeting society sponsors, potential Short Course Organizers should contact the appropriate society for direction.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix 1A.  Abstract Receipt Notification Letter


Example from St. Catharines 2004-01-09

 SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1 Dear ………….

Your Abstract submission (abstract No. X; entitled ……………) has been received as ………(file type) by St. Catharines 2004.

When registering for the conference you must provide your assigned password to gain re-entry to your file.  Your password also allows submission of additional abstracts if you wish up to January 19, 2004.  Your password is ……

Authors/Speakers will be notified of the acceptance status of their abstract by early March 2004 to the e-mail address provided.  Preliminary information will be sent at this time as to session, and method of presentation for accepted abstracts.

Please note that all lecture rooms will be equipped with one computer projector (suitable for Microsoft PowerPoint presentations) and an overhead projector.  Oral presentations will be allotted 20 minutes including three minutes for discussion, unless otherwise agreed.  Please consult the website
http://www.stcatharines2004.ca/ for further information and instructions.

If you have further inquiries concerning the program, please contact Greg Finn (Program Chair) at 905 688-5550 x3528 or
gacmac04@brocku.ca


If you have a concern regarding your submitted abstract, please contact the abstract office via the e-mail address or telephone number below.  The office is located in St. John’s Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada and is open between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm.

E-mail 
StCath2004@esd.mun.ca   Tel  709-737-7660


Appendix 1B.  Abstract Review


The web search facility is located at the URL:
http://gac.esd.mun.ca/GAC®_200X/seven/default.asp where X is the year of the meeting

This will bring up the log-in screen

Login

Login Name

 

Password

Figure 1.  The log-in screen


The guest will need a username and password (provided by Registration office) to gain read-only access to the database.

After logging on with the above password, (no prompt is given) the guest will need to click on "searching", then "search", to bring up the following search screen.

Search for Records in GAC® Abstract Database

Author Last Name

*

Program Session

**

Records to Fetch:

String Searching Method: *

Show Abstracts with Alternate
Session Choice:
**

Display Mode:

If you don't know what to search for,
Just Press 'Submit Request'.

Display Assigned Session?
**

Figure 2.  The abstract search screen


The database can be searched from this screen by author name or program session.  The above is the default view.

  1. Enter the author last name or choose a program session from the pick list.
  2. If you wish to see sessions as they were requested by the author, leave the “Display Assigned Session” box at bottom right as “No”.  If you wish to see sessions as assigned in the program or following review, change this to “Yes”.
  3. The “Display Mode” box allows you see: “abbreviated” (titles and author info); “long” (titles, authors and abstract), “titles only” or “program” (titles etc. as arranged in the program).
  4. “Show Abstracts With Alternate” means show the selected abstracts with the requested alternate session.
  5. The “String Searching Method” box can be used to select the type of search – “exactly as typed”, “anywhere in the column or string”, or “begins with…”
  6. The “Records to Fetch” button can be used to limit the number of records retrieved.


When finished, click ‘Submit Request’ to start the search. This will bring up a list of the title and author names for the requested session (see Figure 3 below).

       

Display Selected Records

No. of Records:  19 
(Oral: 14;  Poster: 4;  Not Assigned: 0)

 

Search Criteria:

  Assigned  
  Program Session
=

SS04 - High Pressure Granulites

 

Presenter

Abstract Body

Session
Choice

George E. Suwalski

View 908
Review

Rocks Rock! (ORAL) (, 0, SS04)

SUWALSKI, G.E., University of Cascadia, University Avenue, Cascadia, SK, F6M 3G7, swalski@gda.esd.ca, JAMES, M.D., Minex Corporation, P.O. Box 4351, Toronto, ON, G3A 5E9 and PETRA, I.S., Geological Survey or Ottawa, P.O. Box 4760, Ottawa, ON, K1A 3S2

First
SS04

 

Second
SY03

 

Patrick J. O'Brien

View 834
Review

High pressure granulites:  Formation, survival of HP-(U)HT relics and implications for tectonics (ORAL) (ORAL, 1, SS04)

O'BRIEN, P.J., Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Universitaet Potsdam, Postfach 601553, D-14415 Potsdam, Germany, obrien@geo.uni-potsdam.de

First
SS04

 

Second
None

 

Jane A. Gilotti

View 292
Review

Structural and metamorphic evolution of high pressure granulites in Payer Land, Greenland Caledonides (ORAL) (ORAL, 2, SS04)

GILOTTI, J.A., Department of Geoscience, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52240, USA, jane-gilotti@uiowa.edu, and ELVEVOLD, S., Norwegian Polar Institute, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway

First
SS04

 

Second
GS06

 

Aphrodite D. Indares

View 290
Review

High-P granulites from the Manicouagan Imbricate Zone (NE Grenville Province):  An overview (ORAL) (ORAL, 3, SS04)

INDARES, A., Earth Sciences, Memorial University, St. John's, NFA1B 3X5, afin@sparky2.esd.mun.ca

First
SS04

 

Second
None

 

Jean E. Martelat

View 600
Review

UHT-HP granulites and migmatites from the Arequipa Massif (Peru):  A case of dry melting? (ORAL) (ORAL, 4, SS04)

MARTELAT, J.E. and MARTIGNOLE, J., Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

Julia A. Baldwin

View 590
Review

Petrology and metamorphic evolution of high-pressure granulites and eclogites from the Snowbird Tectonic Zone, northern Saskatchewan (ORAL) (ORAL, 5, SS04)

BALDWIN¹, J.A., jbaldwin@mit.edu, WILLIAMS², M.L. and BOWRING¹, S.A.,  ¹Dept. of EAPS, MIT, 54-1118, Cambridge, MA  02139,  ²Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA  01003

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

Kevin H. Mahan

View 583
Review

The Legs Lake shear zone, northern Saskatchewan, exhumation of lower crustal rocks of the western Churchill Province, Canadian Shield (ORAL) (ORAL, 6, SS04)

MAHAN, K.H., WILLIAMS, M.L., Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, 611 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA  01003-9297,  kmahan@geo.umass.edu, and BALDWIN, J.A., Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, MIT, 54-1118, Cambridge, MA  02139

First
SS04

 

Second
GS06

 

Antonio Castro

View 835
Review

Granulites by experiments (ORAL) (ORAL, 7, SS04)

CASTRO, A. and LOPEZ, S., Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Campus de La Rabida, 21819 Huelva, Spain

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

David R.M. Pattison

View 374
Review

The problem of garnet+clinopyroxene-bearing metabasites:  High pressure granulites, upper amphibolites, or does it matter? (ORAL) (ORAL, 8, SS04)

PATTISON, D.R.M., Department of Geology & Geophysics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, pattison@geo.ucalgary.ca

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

Alison M. Leitch

View 270
Review

Pervasive flow model for granite magma migration (ORAL) (ORAL, 9, SS04)

LEITCH, A.M., Memorial University, St John's, NF, A1B 3X5, aleitch@waves.esd.mun.ca, and WEINBERG, R.F., University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA, 6907, Australia

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

Edward D. Ghent

View 53
Review

Mesozoic granulite facies metamorphism of the Pitka mafic/ultramafic complex, Northern Alaska (ORAL) (ORAL, 10, SS04)

GHENT¹, E.D., ghent@geo.ucalgary.ca, ROESKE², S., STOUT¹, M.Z., BRADSHAW³, J.Y. (deceased),  ¹Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, U. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4,  ²Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616,  ³U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage, Alaska

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

Toby Rivers

View 98
Review

The high pressure belt in the Grenville Province (ORAL) (ORAL, 11, SS04)

RIVERS¹, T., trivers@sparky2.esd.mun.ca., KETCHUM², J., INDARES¹, A. and HYNES³, A.,  ¹Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University, St. John's, NF, A1B 3X5,  ²Royal Ontario Museum, 100 Queen's Park, Toronto, ON, M5S 2C6,  ³Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montréal, QC, H3A 2A7

First
SS04

 

Second
GS06

 

Jacques Martignole

View 538
Review

Mafic dykes as monitors of HP-granulite facies metamorphism in the Grenville Front Zone of western Quebec (ORAL) (ORAL, 12, SS04)

MARTIGNOLE, J., martigno@ere.umontreal.ca, and MARTELAT, J.E., Departement de geologie, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Montreal, H3C 3J7, QC

First
SS04

 

Second
GS06

 

Rebecca A. Jamieson

View 86
Review

Chemical and age zoning in monazite from polycyclic paragneiss, Central Gneiss Belt, Grenville Orogen, Ontario (ORAL) (ORAL, 13, SS04)

JAMIESON, R.A., Department of Earth Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, B3H 3J5, beckyj@is.dal.ca; WILLIAMS, M.L., JERCINOVIC, M.J., Department of Geological Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA, 01003, and TIMMERMANN, H., NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Keyworth, Nottingham, UK, NG12 5GG

First
SS04

 

Second
GS06

 

Craig D. Storey

View 121
Review

The thin end of the (Grenville) wedge?  Tectonothermal history of the Glenelg-Attadale Inlier, NW Scotland (ORAL) (ORAL, 14, SS04)

STOREY¹, C.D., cds7@le.ac.uk, BREWER¹, T.S., PARRISH1,2, R.R. and TEMPERLEY¹, S., ¹Orogenic Processes Group, Dept. of Geology, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH, UK,  ²NERC Isotope Geoscience Laboratory, British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK

First
SS04

 

Second
GS02

 

Jason B. Krauss

View 123
Review

High-pressure (HP), granulite-facies thrusting in a thick-skinned thrust system in the eastern Grenville Province, central Labrador (ORAL) (POSTER, 99, SS04)

KRAUSS, J.B. and RIVERS, T., Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF, A1B 3X5, v86jbk@morgan.ucs.mun.ca

First
SS04

 

Second
SY03

 

Sherri L. Jordan

View 152
Review

Textures and garnet zoning in magmatitic kyanite-metapelites in the southern Gagnon Terrane (Grenville Province) (ORAL) (POSTER, 99, SS04)

JORDAN, S.L., sherrijordan@hotmail.com, INDARES, A. and RIVERS, T., Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NF, A1B 3X5

First
SS04

 

Second
None

 

Sandrine Cadéron

View 463
Review

Sapphirine in the Superior Province:  Tectonic implications (POSTER) (POSTER, 99, SS04)

CADÉRON¹, S., d216751@er.uqam.ca, BÉDARD², J., GOULET¹, N. and MADORE³, L.,  ¹Université du Québec à Montréal, 201 Président Kennedy, Montréal, QC, H2X 3Y7,  ²Geological Survey of Canada, CP7500 Ste-Foy, QC, G1V 4C7,  ³Géologie Québec, 400 boulevard Lamaque, Val-d'Or, QC, J9P 3L4

First
SS04

 

Second
GS09

 

Allen J. Dennis

View 898
Review

Recognizing a terrane boundary internal to the Carolina composite terrane, Southern Appalachian Piedmont:  Eclogite-granulite facies metamorphism north of the Carolina slate belt-Charlotte belt boundary (POSTER) (POSTER, 99, SS04)

DENNIS, A.J., Department of Bioloy & Geology, University of South Carolina Aiken, Aiken, SC 29801-6309, dennis@sc.edu, and SHERVAIS, J.W., Department of Geology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4505

First
SS04

 

Second

 

 

Figure 3.  The search results screen

 

Review Procedures

Clicking on the green “View ### “ at left on the above screen in Figure 3 will bring up the details associated with that abstract submission.  Clicking on the green “Review” brings up a review screen (see Figure 4 below), which can be used by session organizers to review the session.  The Program Chair can provide a unique password to each session organizer so that they can review the papers in their session only.   The organizers can then can fill in comments and decide what order the talks are to be presented in, as well as their mode (oral/poster) of presentation, etc.  There is also a "Superpassword" for the Program Chair that allows access to all reviewing parameters for all sessions.

 

Reviewer's Form for Abstract 600

Requested Session:  

SS04 - 

High Pressure Granulites

 

Session Organizer:  

Aphrodite Indares

Abstract Number:  600

Title:  

UHT-HP granulites and migmatites from the Arequipa Massif (Peru): A case of dry melting?

 

Presenter:  

Jean E. Martelat

Office:  

514 343 7734

Fax:  

514 340 3970

email:  

martelaj@magellan.umontreal.ca

 

Authors:  

MARTELAT, J.E. and MARTIGNOLE, J., Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7

Invited Paper: (Y/N)  N

Student Paper: (Y/N)  N

Requested Mode:  Oral

Autocancel: (Y/N)  N

 

FOLLOWING TO BE FILLED IN BY REVIEWER / ORGANIZER

Several of the fields below can be populated from example values in "Select:" boxes located to the right of these fields.  These fields can still be edited after selection.

Accepted or Rejected:  

Select:

Remarks:

Confirm the Session Assignment:

Select:

Confirm presentation mode - choose ONE of the following. Before doing this, take note of the Autocancel box - if Yes, it means that the paper may have to be cancelled.

Select:

Duration of talk (indicate whether 20 or 40 minutes; 40 is normally reserved for keynotes)

minutes

Order of oral presentation in your session (1 being the first talk)

Reviewed by:  

Select:

 

Review Date:  

Select:

Figure 4.  Abstract Reviewer’s screen

 

Changing a Session Assignment or Presentation Mode

When performing these sorts of reassignments, it is vital to remember that the database always preserves the original author selection as its default view.  Changes to this view are preserved in a separate version of the database.  On the web site, they correspond to the views seen with the “Display Session Assignment” box in Figure 2 set to “No” (original submitted requests) as opposed to “Yes” (the LOC’s revised version).

To make a change:

In the search screen shown in Figure 2, first search for the appropriate author name or session in the default author-requested view (i.e. with the “Display Assigned Session” box in Figure 2 set to “No”) and submit the selection.

Now click the green “review” button under the author’s name to go to the review form shown in Figure 4.

Session assignment changes are made in the “Confirm the Session Assignment” box at the bottom of Figure 4.  The text string box containing the session name has to be changed as well as the session code box to its left.  Type the code in if it does not change automatically.

Changes to mode of presentation (oral vs. poster), duration and order are made on the bottom half of the review form (Figure 4).  For a mode change, make sure that the left hand box actually reads the correct choice and type it in if necessary.  If changing mode, organizers should take note of whether the presenter has set the autocancel choice as Y or N.  If set to Y, it means that if the mode is changed then the presenter wishes to have the abstract withdrawn.

Confirm changes by clicking on the “Submit Changes” button at the bottom of the form in Figure 4.  Note that the changes will appear not to have registered on the page that you are looking at.  This is because you are in the default view that does not change.

Now go back to the search screen (Figure 2) and select the session that you have assigned the author to.  This time, however, also change the “Display Assigned Session box to “Yes”.  Now submit the search and the reassigned presentation should appear in its correct place.  Note that if oral presentations are re-assigned to poster they will go to the bottom of the session list.


 

Appendix 1C.  Preparing the Program


The superpassword (see above) gives access to all review forms where the Program Chair (or delegates) can assign times and rooms to each paper in an entire session.  To do this, when a reviewer's form page is brought up, type the superpassword at the bottom of page and submit.  The form displays the fields that the reviewer can change.  By default the paper is assigned to the first choice that the presenter chose when submitting the abstract.  However, the reviewer may decide to assign that paper to a different session.  Posters would be given a 99 in the talk-order field.

The reviewers form as accessed by the superpassword also allows access to a number of other editing fields shown at the bottom of the form in Figure 4.  These are used primarily for organizing the program.  The "Edit Session Schedule” button brings up the SuperReviewer’s Edit form with all the papers listed for that session (see Figure 5 below).  Remember that in order to make the changes take effect, you have to click the submit button at the bottom of this page.  This will write the changes to the database and refresh the entire table.  Also, to look at a different session, choose a different session at the bottom and click the "Submit Changes" button.  After making changes, remember to always refresh the current session by clicking the "Submit Changes" before moving on to the next session.  Otherwise, the changes will not take effect.  For posters, by putting "99" in the "talk order" field, the papers will be sorted by number and thus all posters will be listed at the bottom.  The Program Chair can then assign a poster order, once it is decided where the posters are to be placed and on what days.  Normally, the posters that are assigned for a particular session stay up for one day, and each is assigned a number for that day that matches the number on the poster board.  The “Edit Session Table” button on Figure 4 allows another session to be selected for editing.  The “Edit This Abstract” button allows changes to be made to a specific abstract.

 

SuperReviewer's Edit Form
Session SS04

Abstract

Poster
Order

Talk
Order

Duration

Time

Date

Room

Mode

Session

Accept

Suwa. - 908

O'Br. - 834

Gilo. - 292

Inda. - 290

Mart. - 600

Bald. - 590

Maha. - 583

Cast. - 835

Patt. - 374

Leit. - 270

Ghen. - 53

Rive. - 98

Mart. - 538

Jami. - 86

Stor. - 121

Krau. - 123

Jord. - 152

Cadé. - 463

Denn. - 898

 

Choose a different Session?

Select:

Figure 5.  The SuperReviewer’s Edit screen for program development and editing

 

The SuperReviewer's edit form is meant for use after the reviewers have completed their forms for the session, and for finalization of the program.  It is useful for oversight of program organization and for the continuous program changes that will be needed as papers are withdrawn, even during the last day or two before the program goes to press.  To change many of the fields in a column of this form to the same value (such as assigning all the talks to the same room or date), just fill in one value and then use the browsers Cut (Cntrl C) and Paste (Cntrl V) capabilities (under the Edit menu) and the mouse to quickly fill in the remaining column values.

Although the software offers the capability to diversify program organization amongst several organizers, it is probably preferable to retain the superpassword for the sole use of the Program Chair; otherwise unintended changes can creep into the program.


Appendix 1D.  Acknowledging Abstract Acceptance and Place in Program


Whilst program development will go on almost to the time of the meeting, there is a point at which presenters must be informed of their abstract acceptance, generally in early March.  Below is a suggested form letter that can be used for this purpose.  The letter should be revised for local context by the Program Chair and then be set up by the Registration Supervisor.  It draws the information on the presenter and presentation directly from fields in the database.  It can be mass e-mailed once the Program Chair has authorized notification and will automatically be sent to any author whose abstract is not flagged in the database as rejected (this includes withdrawn abstracts).  Care must, therefore, be taken that rejected and withdrawn abstracts are identified as such.  The letter can also contain further instructions for presentations at the meeting.

Rejected presentations are generally handled individually by the Program Chair.

Example acceptance letter:

I am pleased to inform you that the following abstract has been accepted for presentation at the………………..200X GAC®-MAC meeting On May XX-XX, 200X at ………………..

THIS IS A PRELIMINARY ASSIGNMENT.  Note that the room and posterboard locations for presentations will be posted on the meeting website: …………………………..  IT IS VITAL THAT YOU periodically check back to the website for further details and for any for program changes.

Presenter: …………………………………

Title: ………………………………………………………………………….

Abstract No…………………………………..

Session: ……………………

Mode of presentation: …………….

Date: 5/27/2003

Time: 11:30:00 AM

Please view the attached file for complete instructions.


It is not absolutely necessary to indicate time and room assignments – this could be done through referral to the web site. Organizers may wish to attach specific additional instructions to this notice. Consult the HQ Registration Supervisor if this is the case.

 


Appendix 1E.  Development of the Online Program-at-a-Glance and Searchable Abstract Database


As noted above, the program may continue to change in minor ways until almost the time of the meeting, however, for practical purposes it is generally necessary to consider it complete by the printing deadline, which is generally no less than three weeks before the meeting.  Although in the past it was the practice to publish the program as part of the Final Circular, the more recent tendency has been to publish preliminary versions on-line and to make the final printed version available at the meeting.  A preferred option is to make the program available on line as soon as possible and also to provide a web-searchable abstract database.  Both are drawn from the Access database at GAC® HQ and are set up to be accessible from the LOC web site.  The routine is called the Program-at–a-Glance, and allows prospective attendees to review the overall technical program (Figure 6 below) and then to click on sessions of interest to see the list of presentations in that session (Figure 7).  From here the viewer can click on individual presentations to view and print the abstract, and also search for particular presentations.

Figure 6.  The Program-at-a-Glance online program for St. John’s 2001

 


Figure 7.  On-line session display, St. John’s 2001


Clicking on one of the "View" links in Figure 7 will bring up a view of only that abstract.  These abstract viewing pages combine HTML with search results using the ASP routine, Sub_Program.asp.  This allows various parts of abstracts to be displayed as web pages in a variety of formats.  The Program at-a-Glance is developed by the St. John's HQ technical consultants and the cost is built into the Registration budget.

Editing Abstracts

As noted previously, a problem associated with pasting abstracts into the database is loss of formatting such as special characters, bolding and italics.  The GAC® HQ staff technical consultants (or the LOC in some circumstances) can restore this through the use of HTML encoding.

If done by HQ staff, this formatting will add to the cost of the registration service.  As an alternative, the LOC can use online abstract editing capabilities (available only under the SuperReviewer password), which can be accessed via a link at the bottom of the Abstract Review page, entitled “Edit this Abstract”.  Clicking this link will result in the display of the SuperReviewer’s Abstract Edit Form; an example, using an abstract from the Vancouver 2003 meeting database, is shown in Figure 8.

This form allows changes to be made to the Title, Author Address, and Body fields of an Abstract.  The small boxes along the left-hand side and top will adjust the sizes of this form’s text display boxes in rows and columns, respectively.  These text boxes will scroll if their contents are larger than the adjusted sizes.  Other information, such as the Presenter’s full name, the list of authors and the name and format of a digital file (if it exists), are displayed for reference during editing.

In addition to changing the text of an abstract, this online editing capability enables HTML code to be inserted into the Title and Body of an abstract so that it displays properly in web-pages and when exported for the Program and Abstracts volumes (see Appendix 1F).  The most commonly used HTML tags are as follows: text is bolded when between the “<b>” and “</b>” tags; italicized text is placed between the “<i>” and “</i>” tags.  Similarly text is subscripted or superscripted when placed between the pairs of tags, “<sub>” & “</sub>” and “<sup>” & “</sup>”, respectively.   Other special characters commonly used are: the Greek symbols, such as delta (use “&delta;”) and sigma (use “&sigma;”); degrees symbol (use “&deg;”); mathematical operators, such as less/greater than or equal to (use “&le;” or “&ge;”), multiply, divide or plus minus (use “&times;”, “&divide;” or “&plusmn;”); copyright, registered or trade mark (use “&copy;”, “&reg;” or “&trade;”); currency, such as euro (use “&euro;”).  More exhaustive lists of HTML tags are available on the Web or by contacting GAC® HQ.

To write the changes directly to the database, the SuperReviewer must click “Submit Changes” with the Abstract Number unchanged (in Figure 8, the number “283").   If a different Abstract Number is selected before clicking “Submit Changes”, any changes to the current abstract will be lost and the form will be refreshed, displaying the contents of the new Abstract Number.  Thus, if there are many changes to be made to an abstract, the editing can be done in stages, with successive submissions of the form while keeping the Abstract Number unchanged.  If changes to several abstracts are required, they can be successively carried out without leaving this form.

Two buttons at the bottom of this form give the SuperReviewer the ability to generate either an author/presenter list or registrant list, sorted alphabetically.  These can be useful for answering such queries as “Which presenters are presenting more than one paper?”, etc.  These two lists can also be cross-referenced with each other to identify presenters who have not yet registered.

The bottom link will take the user back to the Reviewers’ Form with the same abstract displayed as when the Abstract Edit form was initiated.

Figure 8.  The Abstract editing screen

 

Searching the Abstract Database

The P-a-a-G is searchable using a built in routine that can search for author name, title (or parts thereof), keyword or session. The search screen is shown below in Figure 9.

Figure 9.  The Abstract database search screen, Vancouver 2003

 


Appendix 1F.  Preparation of the Abstract Volume


The final step in the program development process is to export the abstract material for preparation of the Program and Abstract Volume(s) - either in printed or CD form - which will be made available at the meeting site.  Recent practice has been to produce separate Program and Abstract volumes.  The Program Volume contains just the program including a summary version of the Program-at-a-Glance, plus the more detailed daily programs.  The Abstract Volume consists of all abstracts, oral and poster, listed in alphabetical order, plus indexes.

The LOC Publications chair, in cooperation with the Technical Program Chair, normally assumes the responsibility of compiling and editing the Program and Abstract volumes.  The Registration office will be responsible for exporting the required input material.  Extensive reformatting will be required to match the desired publication style.  At least three weeks time by a dedicated word processor operator should be assigned to this process.  Further time will also be needed for professional lay-out and printing or duplicating.

There are two methods of exporting files from the database:

1.   Direct export of a text file from the database.

This is based upon export of an MS Word .rtf file from the database. The database is first sorted into alphabetical order then exported using a customized process that inserts blanks for files which have been submitted as separate formatted files (these are subsequently imported into the word processor version).  The Program Chair should coordinate with the Registration Supervisor at GAC® HQ concerning the export format that is required.  Problems may be encountered with a quirk of the export process that interprets some fonts as line spacings.  This can be corrected in Word by making a global change to a line spacing of 1.  Formatted Word or WordPerfect files that were submitted by e-mail or upload will be transmitted to the LOC and can then be imported into the blank spaces.

2.  Preferred Method - Export of abstract information from the database as web pages (HTML).

The database abstract records can be converted to HTML pages (see the editing abstracts procedure described above) then imported into a word processor program for final organization and formatting.  The export file can be formatted to get the information as close as possible to the desired final format.  All that then remains is to rearrange blocks of text and change the overall font, etc.  The export HTML file should display all the abstracts for oral presentations in each session, together with their times, and with the posters listed at the end of each session.

An example of how an export file looks is given below.  The export is usually done at GAC® HQ but could be transferred to the LOC if requested:

GS1:  Economic Geology
Organizers / Organisateurs:  Programme Committee
Room / Salle:  Music 3
Chairs / Présidents: 

9:20  zzz Gale, G.H.* and Fedikow, M.A.F. zqz Vectoring volcanogenic massive sulphide type deposits using rare earth element signatures of sulphidic rocks

9:40  zzz Beaudoin, G.* and Gagnon, Y. zqz Oxygen isotope cross-section of the synvolcanic VMS hydrothermal system of the Val-d'Or Camp

10:00  zzz Straub, K.H. zqz Hydrothermal alteration and base-metal mineralization in the Marshall Lake area, northern margin of the Onaman-Tashota Greenstone Belt (2736 Ma), East Wabigoon Subprovince

10:20  zzz Rasilainen, K. zqz Host rock geochemistry at the Paleoproterozoic Pyhäsalmi VHMS deposit, Central Finland

10:40  zzz MacDonald, C.A.*, Gibson, H.L., Whitehead, R.E., Lane, T.E., Galley, A.G. and McCutcheon, S.R. zqz Architecture, volcanology and environments of the Nepisiguit Falls Formation


 SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1 The text for each abstract in the listing above was generated by the following code in the abstract format field of the format table:

<b><i><=time></i></b> zzz <b><=authors*,type=4></b> zqz <=abs_title><br><br>

 

The format of how the title and authors of each paper would look should be decided before export, since this saves considerable manual reformatting later.  Note that there needs to be an asterisk (*) beside the presenter, (who is not necessarily the first author), but only in instances where there is more than one author.  This is all built into the logic of the ASP page, where the presence of the asterisk is controlled in the format of the table.  Similarly, whether an author will appear as “R.A. Cox” or “Cox, R.A.” can be controlled by specifying the “type=” part of the above format.

To export from the HTML page, the browser's Edit function (see the Edit button of your browser) is used to "Select All", and then "Copy".  The entire document contents are then pasted into a blank WordPerfect or Word document to form the basis of the Program and Abstract Volume.

There are some format changes that cannot be made directly in HTML.  For example the editor may want to insert an indent after the time for each talk in the Program Volume.  This can, however, be done by inserting a " zzz " string between the Time and Authors fields.  After import into WordPerfect/Word, a global search and replace can be made to replace the " zzz " string with the "Indent" code.  "zzz" is used because it is highly unlikely to occur anywhere else in the text.  Likewise, there is no easy way to put two spaces after the Authors field and have them remain when exported to WordPerfect/Word.  So, the user can insert the string " zqz " and globally replaced it with "space-space".  The rest of the formatting, such as putting in the names of session chairpersons, reorganizing sessions, or portions thereof, and organizing the posters, etc., has to be done by the LOC publications staff.  To a large extent this should require only global changes in the word processor format.  A final task is to develop the index of authors and presenters that goes in the back of the abstract volume.  This is done using the word processor’s standard internal features for this procedure.

The above is just an overview of the process.  It is recommended that further advice be sought from GAC® HQ if this procedure is to be used.

Formatted Files

Recollect that presenters have the option of submitting formatted Word or WordPerfect files which are then stored at GAC® HQ.  These will be transferred to the LOC and can then be either pasted in to replace ASCII versions in the export file, or used as editing guides for the exported text.


Appendix 2A.  Required entry fields for registration forms (printed and downloadable)


Fields that must generally be included in this form are (asterisk indicates required):

*Information for delegate badge

*First Name; *Last name;
*Organization/University (name as it should appear on badge)

 
 


 


GAC®/MAC Membership Number; other membership nos.
*Street address; P.O. Box; *City; *Province/State; *Postal/Zip code; *Country
*Business phone; home phone number; *fax number; *e-mail address
Anticipated place of accommodation at conference site


Guest Information
*Last name; *First name
*Street address; P.O. Box; *City; *Province/State; *Postal/Zip code; *Country
*Contact phone;  *e-mail address
Anticipated place of accommodation at conference site


*Registration fees – the following are the normal categories, though not all need be used. (Note that all taxes should be included in the fees.)
For each category there has to be an early and a late fee.
GAC®/MAC member
GAC®/MAC student member

Student non-member
Non-member
Retired/Unemployed member

Retired/Unemployed non-member
One-day member – specify which day
One-day non-member – specify which day
Accompanying Guest
Exhibitor


Short Courseslist all courses together with professional and student fees

Workshops - list all workshops together with professional and student fees

Field Tripslist all pre-meeting and all post-meeting trips, together with provision for assigning a first or second choice to the selection, the costs and the number of seats required (if for example the registrant wishes to take a guest on the trip).  Also indicate the cut-off date for registration.
Gender; smoking/nonsmoking are possible queries for field trip accommodation purposes


Social Eventslist these divided in to Luncheon, Evening and Other events, together with provision for stating the number of tickets required and the cost.

Guest Eventslist these together with provision for stating the number of tickets required and the cost.

Special Requirementsprovide space for description of any dietary or mobility restrictions/requirements for registrant and guest.

*Payment – note all taxes should be included in the fees – do not leave it to registrants to calculate and add taxes
Total Registration fees
Total Social Event fees
Total Short Course fees
Total Workshop fees
Total Field Trip fees
Total Guest Event fees

*Total fees remitted (all taxes included)

*Payment method (Visa, MasterCard, cheque, money order etc.)
*Name on credit card; Credit card expiry date; Signature


Critical dates
Dates of meeting
Deadline for receipt of registration
End of early (discounted) registration
End of field trip and short course registration (usually = end of early registration)
Cancellation deadline beyond which refunds will not be made

Return Address – mail and fax


Appendix 2B.  Sample Exhibitor Information and Registration Form (from St. John’s 2001)


Note: this is an example only – it is up to the LOC to determine policy with respect to access to the AGM events, fees etc. in accordance with the Exhibits section of the AGM guide.

Dear Exhibitor

In order to process your booth registration we will need you to complete and return the attached forms.  All booth personnel must be identified and registered on the attached exhibitor registration formFor security reasons, only personnel wearing conference name tags will be allowed access to the exhibits area.

Each booth will receive tickets for admission of four individuals to the opening ice-breaker event, which will be held in the exhibits area.  All booth personnel are also entitled to attend social and guest events provided that they purchase tickets for these events.  These can be purchased on the attached exhibitor registration form.

The exhibits booth rental fee also includes one full individual registration which allows one named person admission to all aspects of the conference, including technical sessions, a copy of the abstracts volume, field trips, short courses, etc.  If you wish to avail of this opportunity, please complete and return the attached individual registration form.  In this case, make sure that the organization name is the same as that identified on the exhibitor registration form and that the registration fees area is left blank.  Pay only for other items that you might purchase.  Other personnel wishing to attend the full conference must also register individually and pay the appropriate fees.  This can be done on-line at http://www.geosurv.gov.nf.ca/stjohns2001/

Fax or mail both forms to:
St. John's 2001, c/o Dept. Mines and Energy
P.O. Box 8700, St. John's NF, A1B 4J6
(Courier address, 1st floor, Natural Resources Building
50 Elizabeth Avenue, A1A 1W5)
Fax number - 709-729-3493

Send this information by May 18, 2001.  Material sent after that date may not arrive in time for processing

General registration information
Information on the conference is available at http://www.geosurv.gov.nf.ca/stjohns2001/ . Watch this site for updates.

All name badges and tickets will be packaged within a single registration kit, labeled with the name of the organization, and available for pick-up at the on-site exhibitor registration desk.  This will be located on the ground floor level of the Thompson Centre at Memorial University and will be open from 12:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, May 27, 7:00 am to 6:00 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, May 28 and 29; and from 7:00 am to 12:00 p.m. on Wednesday, May 30, 2001.

  SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1

GENERAL EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION FORM
To be completed by all Exhibitors

Name of exhibitor organization (as it should appear on badge) ....................................................................

Booth Number (if known)....................................................

Name of contact person responsible for booth   ................................................................

Contact address
Street............................................................................................................................................
P.O. Box ..............................              City ................................... Province/State ...........................
Postal/Zip code .......................          Country .............................................................
Bus. Phone ..................................... Home phone ...........................              Fax ..................................
Cell phone or pager (at conference) ........................................  
E-mail ..................................
Staying at (in St. John’s) ....................................................................................................

*Booth personnel - Fill in names, as they should appear on badges; please print clearly

Name, #1

Name, #2

Name, #3

Name, #4

Additional Names:

 

 


* Four personnel will receive free admission to the opening ice-breaker event

If one of the above individuals wishes to avail of full registration, he/she should also complete the attached individual registration form.

Social Events

Evening                              Cost ($Can.)                       No. of tickets                      $Can.
2001 Banquet (May 28)    $................                           ..........                                   $............
Lobster Do (May29)          $................                           .........                                    $............
Pub Crawl (May 30)           $................                           .........                                    $............

Luncheons
GAC® Luncheon (May 28)  $................                           ...........                                  $............


Appendix 2C.  Acknowledging Receipt of Registrations


Each registration must be acknowledged as soon as possible.  This is generally done by E-mail.  The following form provides an example of a reply letter that can be auto-generated from the database.


To: ..........................................
Subject: GAC®/MAC 2001 - Registration Confirmation

GAC®/MAC St. John’s 2001
c/o Geological Association of Canada
Dept. Earth Sciences
Memorial University of Newfoundland
St. John’s Canada, A1B 3X5

To ...............
Address .....................

Date .................................

Thank you for registering for GAC®/MAC 2001 (Registration ID xx). You have been registered for the following items:

Registration
Category (e.g. member):                  $xxx
Social Events:
List                                                                    $xxx
Short Courses:
List                                                                    $xxx
Workshops:
List                                                                    $xxx
Field Trips:
List                                                                    $xxx
Guest Events:
List                                                                    $xxx
Total amount received (including taxes):       $xxx
Receipt #: xxx ($xxx)
GST Registration No. xxxxxxxxxxxx

The Cancellation and Refund deadline is May 1, 2001.  Cancellations in part or in full must be made in writing to St. John’s 2001
An official receipt will be issued at registration.  In the meantime if you need further information or have additional requirements, please contact the GAC®/MAC 2001 REGISTRATION OFFICE at telephone 709-729-3994 (709-737-4306 after April 01); stj2001@sparky2.esd.mun.ca or the Registration chair (Richard Wardle) at 709-729-2107;
rjw@zeppo.geosurv.gov.nf.ca.


Appendix 2D.  Searching, Reviewing and Editing Registration data via the Web Facility


This is the method used by the LOC and associated organizers who need remote access to the database to review data.  It can be used with any recent version of Netscape or Microsoft Explorer.

The web search facility is located at the URL:
http://gac.esd.mun.ca/gac_200X/search_reg/start.asp where X is the year of the meeting

This will bring up the log-in screen (Figure 10) below.

 

Login

Login Name

 

Password

Figure 10.  The registration web search log-in screen


The guest will need a username and password, obtainable from the Registration Supervisor, to proceed.  Specific passwords can be issued to event organizers, or a super-password can be given that provides access to all categories.  These are contained in database look-up tables and can be changed as needed.  With these links the reviewer can gain read-only access to the database.

After clicking on “login”, the following search screen is displayed (Figure 11).

Search for Event Attendance
in GAC® Registration Database

Select Event Class 

Figure 11.  The first Registration search screen


The database can be searched from the screen in Figure 11 by selecting events or functions listed in the roll-down selection list.  At present these are: Registration Categories, Field Trips, Short Courses, Workshops, Social Events and Guest Events.  Select one from the list.  This will bring up a second search screen (Figure 12) asking you to select the function or event of interest within the selected category (e.g. Field Trip A1 out of Field Trips).  Select the function or event and click “Submit Request”.

If you wish to see ALL functions or events in the selected category, omit the last selection step and simply click the “Submit Request” button.  This will bring up all the events in that category (e.g. Field Trips).

 

Determine Subscription to Field Trips
in GAC® Registration Database

Field Trips 

*

Display Mode:

* To summarize ALL Field Trips,
  just leave the above selection blank.

Figure 12.  The second Registration search screen


Note that the “Display Mode” box at left in Figure 12 can be set to “abbreviated” (provides names and essential information only; “totals” (provides totals on registration for each event and function; or “long” (provides detailed information on each registrant in list).

A sample long-search result from Field Trips is shown in Figure 13 below.

Figure 13.  Sample long search result from Field Trips

 


Appendix 2E.  The Standard Conference Name Badge and Receipt

 

Figure 14.  The GAC®/MAC Name Badge/Receipt (Vancouver 2003 example)

 


 

 

Appendix 2F  Suggested simplified on-site registration form

 

This should be available as a printed form that on-site registrants can complete prior to approaching the registration desk. An electronic version of the form (available from HQ) should be set up on the registration computers so that name badges and receipts can be generated. Laser printers using blank name badge/receipt stock provide by HQ will be needed for printing

 

 

ST CATHARINES 2004

GAC®/AMC Annual Meeting

On-site registration form

 

Information for your Name Badge

 

 

Name ………………………………………………………………………………….

 

 

Affiliation (Institution) ……………………………………………………………….

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Your mailing address: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

E-mail address  ……………………………………………………………………..

 

 

 

 
 


Are you a GAC® or MAC member?          Yes                  No

You may be asked for proof of membership

 

 

 
Registration Fee:

GAC®/MAC member              $425                                                  

 

 
 


Non-member professional   $540

 

 
 

GAC®/MAC student member            $100                           Students must present valid student ID

 

 
 


Retired/Unemployed                         $220

 

 

One-day GAC®/MAC member $200

 

 
 


One-day non-member          $225

 

 
 


Accompanying Guest           $40                             Total Payment $ ………….                       

 

 

 

 

 

 
 


Payment by:  Visa               Mastercard                Cheque/cash

 

 


Appendix 3 Guidelines for GAC® Short Courses

 

GEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

 

Short Course Guidelines

 

These guidelines are provided to assist individuals wishing to propose, develop and present a short course, sponsored by GAC®, as part of an Annual Meeting.

 

Introduction

 

GAC® Short Courses are professional development training courses, centered on the review of a specific topic, intended to rapidly bring participants up to speed on that topic, from historical aspects to latest developments. Potential subjects vary as widely as the diverse membership of GAC® itself, but potential organizers should intend to attract a large enough audience (eg. 30-40 participants) to make the course viable.  The course is normally designed around a series of lectures, by multiple presenters, and if feasible, accompanied by practical activities or demonstrations.  A Short Course may be complimented by, but not be intended to replace, a special session of the Annual Meeting.

 

            An important part of organizing a Short Course is establishing financial responsibility and underwriting of the course by the sponsoring party.  This is because Short Course budgets are independent of all other meeting budgets and shall be accounted for separately from the Annual Meeting budget.  Sponsors cover financial liability (profit or loss) of the course, and thus prudent budgeting is a necessity.  GAC® will not approve poorly budgeted Short Courses, and may cancel Short Courses that show early signs of not breaking even financially.

 

General

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Responsibilities

Many people, from several organizations, are involved in the successful running of Short Courses at the Annual Meeting.  As such, it is vital that individuals understand their own, and each other’s, roles, to ensure the most efficient and effective use of time and communications.  Understanding the first point of contact is very important.

 

GAC® Short Course Coordinator:

This person is a member of the Program Committee of GAC® Council and shall:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LOC  Short Course Chair

Each Annual Meeting Local Organizing Committee shall have a Short Course Chair who is the on-site, principal contact between the Short Course Organizers, the GAC® Short Course Coordinator, MAC and the on-site facility.  They shall:

 

 

 

 

·         Ensure that an appropriate room is located for the course, and that rental costs for room, projection equipment (and other technical services) are communicated to the Short Course Organizer and Short Course Coordinator (GAC® and MAC) for budgeting purposes.

 

·         Provide booking details, menus or catalogues for any catering needs and make the required reservation arrangements (both for in-class refreshments and any out-of-class meals that are included in the short course fee).

 

·         Forward or invoice, as appropriate, any direct costs incurred by the LOC that are associated with the course to the Short Course Organizer, or to the course sponsor.

 

·         Ensure that registration materials and on-site requirements are ready in advance, especially for university-based meetings that hold the short course over a weekend.  Often in May campus facilities are limited.  This material includes name tags and site maps.  It is appreciated if registration packages can be delivered by the LOC short course chair directly to the short course participants at the earliest opportunity.

 

The Short Course Chair may also, in consultation with the GAC® Short Course Coordinator, suggest ideas for short courses to sponsoring societies

 

The Short Course Organizer

Every GAC® sponsored Short Course shall have a Short Course Organizer(s).  This person(s) holds a most vital role in the successful delivery of a short course at the Annual Meeting.  They shall:

 

 

 

·         Prepare advertisements for the Short Course, and make them available to the LOC Short Course Chair and GAC® short course coordinator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

o        ensures information packages are available for participants (travel recommendations, maps, accommodation options, schedule)

o        reserves accommodation for speakers

o        ensures that refreshment breaks and lunches are organized

o        ensures that meeting rooms are booked with appropriate audiovisual equipment

o        keeps pressure on the instructors to show up as planned, or find replacements as needed

o        organizes any events associated with the short course (e.g., lab visits, computer labs, dinners), or makes it clear to participants to organize their own

 

 

Financial

 

 

o        Estimated income from registration fees (professional and student) and sponsorships

o        Estimated Expenses for:

Travel and accommodation for instructors

Registration fees that will be paid for instructors

Preparation and printing of course notes

Cost of space and AV equipment rental

Coffee, lunches etc.

Honoraria or stipends payable to instructors

Cash advances needed by organizers

 

The budget should also include, in addition to the professional and student registration fees to be charged, a prediction of additional handling fees for participants who do not register for the Annual Meeting (see below). Student fees are generally set at half the professional fee.

 

 

 

 

 

Planning and Deadlines

 

The GAC® Short Course Coordinator should ensure that the LOC, through its Short Course Chair is kept fully informed about short course developments and Council decisions

 

 

 

 

 

Publications

 

o        Capitalize on all the hard work and time invested by the organizer and the instructors by leaving a lasting record of the effort.

o        Participants are ensured to get a well put together, easy to follow volume, rather than a last-minute staple job.

o        The notes volume goes on in perpetuity long after the course ends.

o        Greatly increases the possibility for the course to be repeated at another time, somewhere else in the country, again capitalizing on the initial investment.

o        New volumes tend to sell exceedingly well on site at the Annual meeting, and sales can continue long afterwards through the GAC® Bookstore, and/or through the sponsoring body.

o        Revenue from book sales are helpful to the sponsoring body and to the GAC® parent body to carry out future activities.

 

 

 

o        The manuscript is delivered to GAC® HQ in a form ready for printing or digital delivery, well in advance (6 weeks) of the Annual Meeting. This means that all reviewing, drafting and layout must be completed prior to delivery.

o        Printing is of a basic nature i.e. normally monochrome and spiral bound or electronic (CD or web-based download)

o        The project is judged to be cost-effective by GAC®

o        Sale and distribution will be through the GAC® bookstore, which offers on-line and e-commerce services

 

 

 

Appendix 3-1: Frequently Asked Questions

 

Appropriate number of Instructors?

Depends very much on the subject matter.  A two-day short course should run with possibly 4 to 8 speakers, some of whom might repeat or break their presentations into sections.  In some cases, one instructor may present the work prepared by someone who cannot attend.

 

What is a reasonable registration fee?

Past short courses have charged fees as follows:

 

Do speakers need to register for the short course?

This depends on the budget, but must be made clear at the start.  Depends on the arrangement between the organizer and presenters. 

 

Can I plan a special event to coincide with the short course?

Yes.  The limit is your imagination.  Do not plan on events that will inflate the registration fee, and are particularly appealing if they are sponsored.


Appendix 3-2: Worked example of a budget

 

 

Course held two days prior to the GAC®-MAC meeting, at a site with a daily room fee and catering fee.  Two coffee breaks are provided.  Lunch both days is included in this budget (or could be the responsibility of the participant if nearby facilities are available; please confirm). Estimate 30 participants.

 

Expenditures:

Item

Number

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Notes

 

 

 

 

 

Speaker Costs

 

 

 

 

No. Speakers

6

 

 

 

Registration costs

3

450.00

1350.00

Complimentary to some speakers

Dinners

 

0

 

Participants are responsible for themselves

Other Meals

 

 

 

Possible early arrivals

Accommodation

6

120.00

720.00

3 people for 2 nights

Transportation

6

20.00

120.00

Local ground transportation – taxis

Air Fares

3

1000.00

3000.00

3 people require travel assistance

Subtotal

 

 

5190.00

 

Site Costs

 

 

 

 

Room Rental

1

500.00

500.00

May need another ‘reception’ room

Audio Visual Rentals

1

250.00

250.00

Arranged by LOC – may be no charge

Student Assistants

2

200.00

400.00

SC registration for 1-2 students (gophers)

Coffee, muffins etc.

4

200.00

800.00

2 breaks per day – recommend seek sponsorship

Lunches

74

15.00

1110.00

 

Wine & Cheese

1

800.00

800.00

Estimate only – recommend seek sponsorship

Signage, badges, bags

 

 

0.00

Usually provided by LOC

Subtotal

 

 

3860.00

 

Publication Costs

 

 

 

 

Volumes for participants

37

10.00

370.00

Spiral bound; price goes down for CD, up for a formal published notes volume if ready

Subtotal

 

 

370.00

 

Other Items

 

 

 

 

Publicity

 

 

300.00

Flyers, mail-outs, courier fees, office costs, etc.

Subtotal

 

 

300.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

9720.00

 

 

Revenue:

Item

Number

Unit value

Total value

Notes

Sponsor donation

1

1000.00

1000.00

GAC® Division donated funds (cash advance)

Professional Registration

18

310.00

5580.00

 

Student Registration

12

190.00

2280.00

 

Wine & Cheese Sponsorship

1

500.00

500.00

By Loyalty Bank of Canada

Coffee & muffins Sponsorship

1

500.00

500.00

By Great Yellow Mines

Total

 

 

9860.00

 

 


Appendix 4 Guidelines for MAC Short Courses

 

MINERALOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

 Short Course Policy and Guidelines

 

Introduction

 

MAC short courses are timeless but timely presentations that provide review, instruction, and opportunity for advancement of understanding in a specific field.  The short course series began in 1976, with the aim of augmenting the scientific program of the annual GAC®-MAC meeting with a series of lectures giving the audience a sound review of the subject matter and concentrating on new developments in the field.  The aim of the course is no different today.  It should be instructive, providing a means whereby a newcomer to the field can quickly come up to speed on the topic.  As such, some part of the course should be devoted to a historical review of the topic, techniques used, and applications.  Where feasible, hands-on activities or demonstrations should also be included.  An MAC short course should not be a short research symposium.  If this format is desired, it is better to include it as a Special Session (open to contributors) or a Symposium (mainly by invitation) in the conference as a whole.  A short course may be complemented by a special session where contributors can present the findings of their recent research.

 

Although MAC short courses are normally given at the annual meeting, they may be sponsored at other times of the year at a different venue, and MAC will entertain proposals to underwrite a repeat presentation of the course. Participants of short courses and workshops, held as part of the annual meeting are not required to register for the meeting, in which case a non-refundable handling fee will be charged in addition to the course fee to cover administrative costs.

 

The MAC short course is designed to publish a topical volume based on presentations given at the course, aimed at the graduate level, and targeting both students and professionals upgrading their skills or seeking an overview of the current state of developments and knowledge in the subject. 

 

Proposals are accepted by the MAC short course coordinator, for approval by Council at least 15 months before the course is to be offered. Courses are normally budgeted to break even based on the anticipated registration numbers (commonly 30-40 participants – see Appendix 4-3).

 

These guidelines are prepared to assist the MAC short course organizers in preparing an MAC short course volume and in organizing a 2 to 3 day short course presented prior to or following the Joint Annual Meeting of the Geological Association of Canada and the Mineralogical Association of Canada or at another suitable venue.

 

Who’s Who?  Roles and responsibilities to make an MAC Short Course happen

 

1.       Short Course Organizer(s)

The short course organizer(s) is the central person responsible for the development of the scientific program, the identification of the speakers, and the review and editing of the short course volume.  As such s/he:

 

In collaboration with the Executive Coordinator:

·         prepares advertisements for the Short Course

 

In collaboration with the Local Organizing Committee Short Course Chair:

·         ensures information packages are available for participants (travel recommendations, maps, accommodation options, schedule)

·         reserves accommodation for speakers

·         ensures refreshment breaks and lunches are organized

·         ensures rooms are booked with appropriate audiovisual equipment

·         ensures that speakers will really come

·         organizes any events associated with the short course (e.g., lab visits, computer labs, dinners)

 

Cover design suggestions will recognize the organizers' institution(s) if desired, and will be finalized with the SC series editor for executive coordinator approval.  Organizers are encouraged to look at previous volumes, and discuss the current format with the coordinator.

 

Organizers should ensure authors are aware that they must obtain copyright permission for any reproduced articles or figures.

 

The short course organizer may request an advance from the treasurer, against anticipated expenses.  An account shall be kept of all transactions.  Should significant advance finances be anticipated, it is advisable to open a separate bank account to handle transactions associated with the course.  At the end of the course, a statement of expenses and the closing balance of the bank account are forwarded to the treasurer as a record of expenditures.

 

2.       Short Course Coordinator

The short course coordinator is appointed for a term by the MAC Council and is a non-voting member of Council.  Responsibilities are:

·         seeks input from Council on matters of direction, theme and subject material for short courses in advance of upcoming meetings.

·         solicits proposals from short course organizers, presents proposals to Council (May GAC® MAC Annual meeting – for approval in principle for courses 2-3 years forward, and final approval 1 year before).

·         acts as liaison between short course organizers, MAC Council, executive coordinator and Local Organizing Committee short course chair, as needed.

 

3.       Series Editor

The short course series editor is appointed for a term by the MAC Council and is a voting member of the MAC publications committee.  Responsibilities are:

·         provides editorial guidelines to the organizer and authors.

·         receives manuscripts of contributors from the short course organizer, edits, composes page layout, and produces "proof"-ready copy. 

·         liaises with executive coordinator to receive cover design suggestions from the short course organizer, and prepares a mock-up cover design for approval by short course organizer. 

·         in concert with the organizer and executive coordinator, determines the suggested selling price of the volume, for Council or executive approval.  (Due to uncertainty in printing and paper costs, this price often may not be set until the volume is received, often very close to the course presentation.)

·         delivers text and diagrams to printer and acts as liaison with the business office to direct the printed volume to the business office for distribution, and to the short course site for registrants and presenters.

·         advises Council on matters of editorial style, design, format, binding and production of the volume.

 

4.       Executive Coordinator

This position, currently held by Pierrette Tremblay, is a behind-the-scenes role.  Aspects relevant to the production of a short course and volume include:

·         forwards proposed SC outlines and budget to Council.

·         liaises with SC series editor to ensure timeliness of production and enforcement of timelines.

·         contracts with a printer (annually or on a three year contract) for the printing and binding of the volume in time for the course.

·         ensures cover graphics are finalised and book printed and delivered.

·         calls for annual report of SC series coordinator for May Council meeting.

 

5.       Local Organizing Committee Short Course Chair

The Local Organizing Committee short course chair is the principal contact between the short course organizer, short course coordinator and the on-site facility.  S/He shall:

·         act as a liaison between the coordinator and/or organizer and the on-site LOC, facilitating the delivery of the courses.

·         ensure that the course description and fees set by MAC are in the registration package, and a mechanism is in place to collect the short course fee plus any applicable taxes.

·         ensure that an appropriate room is located for the course, and that rental costs for room, projection equipment are communicated to the short course organizer and short course coordinator

·         provide booking details, menus or catalogs for any catering needs and make the required reservation arrangements (both for in-class refreshments and any out-of-class meals that are included in the short course fee).

·         forward or invoice as appropriate any direct costs incurred by the Local Organizing Committee that are associated with the course to the short course organizer, or to the MAC Treasurer.

·         The LOC short course chair should ensure that registration materials and on-site requirements are ready in advance, especially for university-based meetings that hold the short course over a weekend.  Often in May campus facilities are limited.  This includes name tags and site plans.  It is appreciated if registration packages can be delivered by the LOC short course chair directly to the short course participants at the earliest opportunity.

 

6.       MAC Business Office

The Business Office is run by Fran Pinard and is located in Nepean, Ontario.  Of relevance to the short course program, the Business Office:

·         receives books from the printer, but on-site required volumes are normally sent directly from the printer to short course organizers or short course site.

·         handles all sales of the short course volumes, at the meeting (through the MAC sales booth) and after the meeting through distribution of promotional material and price lists with annual notices and newsletters, receipt of orders by telephone, FAX, internet or email.

 

7.       MAC Council

Elected by the membership of the Mineral Association of Canada, the MAC Council meets annually, and approves all business of the Association.  This body will receive all proposals for short courses.   Normally approval in principle for a short course topic is given 18 months-2 years in advance, at which point the short course organizer is appointed.  At the (May GAC®-MAC) Council meeting a year in advance of the course the Council shall consider the short course budget.

 

The treasurer will arrange for advances to the short course organizer if needed, as dictated by the budget, to cover his/her costs during the development of the course and the volume. Advances should be requested in writing.

 

Procedure and Timelines

Proposals for a short course may be generated by individuals and submitted for consideration, or may be solicited by the MAC Council or short course coordinator.  A summary proposal for consideration by Council should be delivered to the Council two years before the proposed date.  The selection will be approved in principle at this point.  In the ensuing year, in collaboration with the short course coordinator, a detailed budget will be prepared and by one year before the course delivery, a course outline, with identified participants, chapter topics and a final budget shall be presented to Council for approval.

 

See Appendix 4-7 for a suggested timing of actions prior to a short course

 


Short Course Volume

The short course volume remains as a legacy of the course for many years.  It must therefore be written and produced with both its immediate use at the short course and its shelf-life in mind.  The number of volumes to be printed is determined in advance by agreement among the short course coordinator, the short course organizer and the MAC executive coordinator, taking into account recommendations from the publications committee and MAC executive as available.

 

Over the final year, the organizer and editor will work closely together to develop a publication that meets the editorial guidelines and format of the series, and that printing deadlines are respected in order to ensure a product in time for the course.  The short course volume is printed in time for delivery to the meeting site, for use by the course participants and for sale at the MAC booth on site.

 

The deadlines for work-flow for the production of the volume (for a mid-May meeting) are:

1 November      All manuscripts received by SC organizer

15 November    Last manuscript out for review

15 February      Last reviewed and corrected manuscripts returned to SC organizer

30 March          Last MS delivered electronically to SC editor

7 April              All MSs posted in pdf format for final proof checks

15 April            Delivery of volume to printer

 

In case of two short courses at the same meeting, a second set of deadlines will be needed, advanced by at least six weeks. 

 

If the course is designed for a delivery at a time other than the annual meeting, the organizer and editor will set the appropriate deadlines for manuscript submission.

 

Subsidies and Registration policy

 

Budget

For MAC short courses held at a joint annual meeting of the GAC® and MAC, these courses are an important part of the meeting; however, the financial obligations incurred by their presentation are the responsibility of the MAC.  The budget will set the registration fee for the course, based on a reasonable best estimate of attendance, and known or estimated costs for production of the short course (site costs). MAC pays all direct costs for editing and printing of the accompanying volume, and the purchase of volumes (provided at cost) should be included as an expenditure item in the budget. A suggested budget format is included as Appendix 4-2.


Appendix 4-1: Frequently Asked Questions

 

How many speakers should I involve?

A two-day short course should run with possibly 6 to 8 speakers, some of whom might repeat or break their presentations into sections.  Many more speakers than this, and the short course begins to turn into a mini-symposium or special session – in this case the organizer should consider whether a short course is warranted, or if it can be augmented by a special session at the accompanying conference.

 

What is a reasonable registration fee?

Past short courses have charged fees as follows:

SC 31 (Vancouver, 2003): $325

SC 32 (Vancouver, 2003): $290

SC 33 (Brock, 2004): professional $380, student $215

SC 34 (Halifax, 2005): professional $430, student $285

SC 35 (Oulu, 2005): professional €350, student €150 (approx. $390, $190 Can)

SC 36 (Montreal, 2006): professional $400, student $200

 

Do speakers need to register for the short course?

This depends on the budget, but must be made clear at the start.  Some courses involve only 4-6 speakers, each of whom may make multiple presentations.  In this case, speakers generally are subsidized.  Other courses have up to 20 or more speakers – for such courses it would be expected that speakers contribute all or part of the registration fee.

 

One of my students is collaborating on one of the chapters.  Can he attend the short course without paying registration?

Only if included in the budget proposal up front.  Assuming the student’s contribution is on only one lecture in the course, he would be expected to pay registration and benefit from the other lectures.

 

Can I plan a special event to coincide with the short course?

Yes.  The limit is your imagination.  Commonly short courses begin with or include a sponsored social event (e.g., wine and cheese reception).  A more ambitious event might be a sponsored group dinner on the middle evening.  It is recommended that such events only be included if sponsored funding is available.  Other special events might include a lab visit, field trip, or public lecture depending on the topic.

 

Who is the best contact to answer any questions?

For topics directly related to the short course, contact the short course coordinator, currently Rob Raeside (rob.raeside@acadiau.ca).  For topics concerning the MAC in general, contact the executive coordinator, Pierrette Tremblay (pierrette_tremblay@ete.inrs.ca).


Appendix 4-2: Worked example of a budget

 

Sample Short Course Budget: 

2 day course,

7 lecturers and the organizer (1 overseas and 1 cross-country)

8 major contributors to the volume

4 lecturers requesting registration support to attend the GAC®-MAC conference.

 

Course held two days prior to the GAC®-MAC meeting, in University or other locale, with a daily room fee and catering fee.  Two coffee breaks are provided.  Lunch both days is included in this budget, but it could be the responsibility of the participant (note at university-based meetings, ensure this is feasible).  A banquet ticket is provided to all lecturers.  Estimate 30 participants.

 

Expenditures:

Item

Number

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Notes

 

 

 

 

 

Speaker Costs

 

 

 

 

No. speakers

8

 

 

 

Registration costs

4

500.00

2000.00

Complimentary to some speakers

Dinners

16

27.00

432.00

 

Other Meals

 

 

500.00

Possible early arrivals

Accommodation

16

115.00

1840.00

Two nights per person

Transportation

16

20.00

320.00

Local ground transportation – taxis

Air Fares

8

820.00

6560.00

 

Subtotal

 

 

11652.00

 

Site Costs

 

 

 

 

Room Rental

1

500.00

500.00

May need another ‘reception’ room

Audio Visual Rentals

1

250.00

250.00

Arranged by LOC – may be no charge

Student Assistance

2

250.00

500.00

SC registration for 1-2 students (gophers)

Coffee, muffins etc.

4

195.00

780.00

2 breaks per day – recommend seek sponsorship

Lunches

76

15.00

1140.00

 

Wine & Cheese

1

800.00

800.00

Estimate only – recommend seek sponsorship

Signage, badges, bags

 

 

0.00

Usually provided by LOC

Subtotal

 

 

3970.00

 

Publication Costs

 

 

 

 

Volumes for participants

38

20.00

760.00

Purchased from MAC at cost

Subtotal

 

 

760.00

 

Other Items

 

 

 

 

Publicity

 

 

300.00

Flyers, mail-outs, courier fees, office costs, etc.

Subtotal

 

 

300.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

16682.00

 

 

Revenue:

Item

Number

Unit value

Total value

Notes

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Registration

28

400.00

11200.00

 

Student Registration

10

250.00

2500.00

 

Wine & Cheese Sponsorship

1

1000.00

1000.00

 

Coffee & muffins Sponsorship

4

500.00

2000.00

 

Total

 

 

16700.00

 


Appendix 4-3: Previous short course topics

Vol, Year

Organizer

Title

Attendance

P, professional S, student

 1 1976

Smith, D.G.W.

Microbeam Techniques

 

 2 1977

Greenwood, HJG

Application of Thermodynamics to Petrology and Ore deposits

 

 3 1978

Kimberley, M.M.

Uranium Deposits, Their Mineralogy and Origin

 

 4

Ledoux, R.I

Mineralogical Techniques of Asbestos Determination ENG/FR

 

 5

Muecke, G.K.

Neutron Activation Analysis in the Geosciences

 

 6 1981

Hollister, L.S. & Crawford, M.L.

Fluid Inclusions: Applications to Petrology (reprinted on CD in Short Course 32)

 

 7

Longstaffe, F.J.

Clays and The Resource Geologist (out of print)

 

 8

 

 

 

 9

Sangster, D.F.

Sediment-hosted Stratiform Lead-Zinc Deposits

 

 10

Fleet, M., Fyfe, W.

Environmental Geochemistry

 

 11 1985

White, J.C.

Applications of Electron Microscopy in the Earth Sciences

 

 12 1986

Scarfe, C.M.

Silicate melts: their Properties and Structure applied to problems in geochemistry, petrology, economic geology and planetary geology.

 

 13 1987

Kyser, T.K.

Stable Isotope Geochemistry of low temperature fluids.

 

 14 1988

Nisbet, E.  & Fowler, C.

Heat Flow, metamorphism and tectonics.

 

 15 1988

Hutcheon, I, & Hesse, R.

Burial diagenesis

 

 16 1989

Petruk, W.

Image Analysis applied to mineral and earth sciences.

 

 17 1989

Jambor, J. & Vaughan, D.

Advanced Microscopic study of ore minerals.

 

 18 1990

Nesbitt, B.

Fluids in tectonically active regimes of the continental crust.

 

 19 1991

Heaman, L, & Ludden, J

Applications of radiogenic isotope systems to problems in geology.

 

 20 1992

Zentilli, M & Reynolds, P

Low temperature thermochronology

 

 21 1993

Luth, R.

Experiments at highpressures and applications to the earth’s mantle.

 

 22 1994

Jambor, J.L,& Blowes, D.

The environmental geochemistry of sulfide mine-wastes.

 

 23 1995

Thompson, J.F.H.

Magmas, fluids and ore deposits.

 

 24 1996

Mitchell, R.

Undersaturated alkaline rocks: mineralogy petrogenesis and economic potential.

 

 25 1997

Groat, L, & McIntyre, J

Biological-Mineral interactions

 

 26 1998

D. Lentz

Mineralized Porplyry-Skarn systems

 

 27 1999

L. Cabri

Ore and Environmental Mineralogy

 

 28 2000

K Kyser

Fluids and Basin Evolution

53

 29 2001

P. Sylvester

Laser-Ablation ICPMS in the Earth Sciences

 

 30 2002

G. Henderson, D. Baker

Synchrotron Radiation: Earth, Environmental and Materials Sciences Applications

50

 31 2003

J. Jambor

Environmental Aspects of Mine Wastes

49P, 10S

 32 2003

I. Samson, A. Anderson, D. Marshall

Fluid Inclusions: Analysis and Interpretation

20P, 20S

 33 2004

P. King, M. Ramsey, G. Swayze

Infrared Spectroscopy in Geochemistry, Exploration Geochemistry and Remote Sensing

20P, 18S

 34 2005

J. Percival, M. Parsons

Mercury: Sources, Measurements, Cycles and Effects

34P, 8S

 35 2005

J. Mungall, M. Iljina

Exploration for Platinum Group Element Deposits (Oulu, Finland)

48P, 9S

 36 2006

J. Webster

Melt Inclusions in Plutonic Rocks

15P, 23S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 4-4: Future meetings and possible short course topics

 

Future meetings

2007:    Yellowknife

2008:    Quebec City

2009:    Toronto

2010:    Calgary

 

Future Short Course topics

Vol, Year

Organizer

Proposed or suggested title

Status

37 2007

L. Groat

Geology of Gem Deposits

Proposed, with MDD

38 2008

G. Beaudoin

Uranium Deposits

Suggested, with SGA

 -   2008

E. Spooner

Migmatites (using Migmatites Special Publication)

Suggested

39 2009

M. Fayek

SIMS

Preliminary proposal in hand

 


Appendix 4-5: Style guide

 

The short course series editor is responsible for taking the manuscripts from the reviewed and corrected stage through to delivery to the printer.  As such he produces "proof" ready copy, usually on a very short time-line.  In order to make this happen, it is imperative that contributors provide material as requested here.  The series editor will make “page-proofs” available as pdf files for a final check of layout and content.

 

How to submit a manuscript

The manuscript will already have been submitted to the short course organizer, who will have it sent out for review.  Dates and deadlines are provided by the short course organizer.  You should now be at the stage of providing the finally corrected manuscript for inclusion in the short course notes (book).  The final text will be produced in Times New Roman 10-point font size, so the closer you are to that, the more like the final product it will look.

 

Text materials: send as .doc file or some compatible format.  Use a recent issue of Canadian Mineralogist for general style.  Do not include any special formatting – no columns, no footnotes, no hidden text, etc.  Equations should be set with a standard equation editor and sequentially numbered.  No abstract is required.

 

Tables: simple tables are best provided as .doc files also.  For large tables, or tables that need to be prepared in a landscape format, Excel files (.xls) are recommended.

 

Figures: original vector files are required.  These will be deleted after use.  CorelDraw is preferred (.cdr), but .eps, .ps, .pdf, .ppt, .ai files can be generally be used for further editing.  Never use “hairline” line weights in figures – printers reproduce them erratically.  Figures commonly need to be touched up to ensure uniformity in font size, line weight, etc.  Do not use colour in figures – it will not be reproduced.  If an illustration must be coloured, it will be separated out and handled as a plate – it may not appear in the same part of the volume as your chapter.  Number all figures sequentially as they appear in the manuscript, but number colour plates separately.  Keep in mind that the final page will be 15 cm across (two columns) or 7 cm (one column), but don’t worry too much about the exact size – pay more attention to image quality and use of space.  Avoid large areas of white space – e.g., select axes to incorporate the data you want to show.

 

Plates: original vector files are required. Plates should only be used where absolutely necessary and may not appear in the body of your chapter.  Plates are extremely expensive!  To give an example of cost, on a print run of 500 copies, two colour pages cost $950 (out of a total cost of $5,920).  They also take longer to process at the print shop, so need to be sent four days earlier than the rest of the manuscript.

 

Copyright

It is the author’s responsibility to obtain copyright.  Most commonly this is for re-use of figures and/or data tables.  You need to obtain copyright permission if you use a figure without modification.  “Modification” means making significant changes – simply adding one point on a map doesn’t count.  In such cases, the original source of the figure should be clearly stated in the figure caption [“used by permission of _________, from Smith and Jones (1998)”].  Even if the figure was originally yours, but has been published elsewhere, it may need copyright permission.  Contact the copyright holder and obtain a letter, a copy of which should end up with the Short Course Series editor.


MAC Short Course - style editing tips

These recommendations were obtained from perusal of recent issues of CanMin

 


Headings:

A three-level hierarchy is used:

LEVEL 1 (upper case)

Level two (lower case, bold-faced). Text starts with an indent on the next line.

Level 3 is bold-faced, italicized and underlined and put on same line as text.

 

Spelling:

- in general, use US format:

center

color

sulfur, sulfide

analyze

crystallization, mineralized

fiber (but note metre for length)

onto

 

Italics:

e.g., Edgar et al. (1989)

i.e., mineralization in veins

cf. Jones (1982)

grains were analyzed in situ…

CuKα, PtLα

f(O2)

versus, vs.

etc.

 

Hyphens:

- in general, noun-adjective noun:

energy-dispersion spectrometer

electron-microprobe analyses

end-member compositions

- also:

well-known locality

high-temperature fluids

low-rank coal

end-members of the solid solution…

very-low-temperature processes

X-ray lines

powder-diffraction data

Bi-, Pb-, Cu- and more complex Pb-bearing varieties

 


N-dashes:

Cu–Fe–S species

Laser ablation – inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry

LA–ICP–MS

It trends NNW or N–S and lies north-northeast of Winnipeg.

0.5–2.0 ppm

sillimanite – garnet – biotite schist (but Mn-Mg-Fe garnet)

from –0.8 to +1.4%

300º–500ºC

the S2– ion

 

Others:

<3 wt.%, ~Au80Ag20, ±0.02

shown in Figure 3-1 and Tables 3-1 and 3-2

35 × 70 μm

micrometres or μm (not microns)

62º21' N

strikes N150–170E

Z > X or Y

kbar (not Kbar, nor kb, nor kbars, but note MPa seem to be preferred in more recent issues)

mL

X-ray

171–249ºC

15 nm long, and a 10-nm gap

two types of “vermiculite”. [uses 66-99 quotes]

These data demonstrate…

For dates: CE and BCE

None of these models provide evidence [none is treated as a plural none]


 

Appendix 4-6: Referees form

 

 
 


MINERALOGICAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

                         MAC Short Course

          Vol. 37: Geology of Gem Deposits

 

Title of Paper: ____________________________________________________

Authors: _____________________________________________________

Report of Referee # ______

 

Please answer each question and add any detailed comments you deem necessary. Minor comments may be made lightly, in pencil, directly on the typescript.

 

1. Do you consider this paper to be appropriate for publication in a Mineralogical Association of Canada short-course volume? Base your overall recommendation on the paper’s effectiveness of presentation and the soundness of the scientific aspects.

 

YES

c

Without change or with but minor changes

YES

c

With major, important revisions or additions

NO

c

Not without a complete rewriting or reorganization

NO

c

Not acceptable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YES

NO

2. Is the paper adequately CONDENSED? If not, which parts should be condensed?

 

c

c

3. Are all FIGURES essential and acceptable? Will they withstand reduction to a width of 8 cm (single column) or 17 cm (double-column width)?

 

 

 

 

c

 

c

4. Is proper CREDIT given to related work? Are the references up-to-date?

 

c

c

5. Are all TABLES essential and acceptable for digital reproduction?

 

c

c

Detailed COMMENTS should be provided on the next page.


Report of Referee #

 

DETAILED COMMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CONFIDENTIAL COMMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you wish to remain anonymous?

Referee’s Signature:

Date:

 

Yes c                         No c

 


Appendix 4-7: Suggested timing of actions prior to a short course

 

Initial proposal to MAC for short course                                                                           24-36 months

Initial proposal to GAC®-MAC LOC for special session                                                      24-36 months

Keynote speaker request letter                                                                                           ~24 months

Identification of all speakers and contributors                                                                      ~20 months

Distribution of instructions to speakers and contributors                                                        ~18 months

Confirmation (possibly with deposits) for room booking through LOC SC chair                        12 months

Prepare advertisements                                                                                                       12 months

Set up e-mail list for advertising                                                                                            12 months

Requests for funding (for SC or special session)                                                                 6-12 months

Deadline for manuscripts for SC volume                                                                                 6 months

Manuscripts out for review                                                                                                 5.5 months

Manuscripts returned from review                                                                                          4 months

Letters for non-Canadians to obtain visas (see http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/visas.html)      4 months

Manuscripts returned from authors after review                                                                   2.5 months

Final logistics for speakers                                                                                                     2 months

 

Items to do one month before the short course

*items marked with asterisk should be done by (or in consultation with) the LOC short course chairperson

 

Finalize schedule

Prepare an information package for participants (leave at hotel...?):

Room

Audio-visual

Student helpers - let them know their duties

 


Appendix 5: Guidelines for Jéröme Remick Poster Awards


Appendix 6: GAC®/MAC Field Trip Safety Policy

 

            This appendix is available for download at www.gac.ca.


Appendix 7: Geological Association of Canada Directory

 

            This appendix is available for download at www.gac.ca.

 



Appendix 8: Annual Meeting Statistics: Program Breakdown.

 


Appendix 9: Annual Meeting Statistics: Registration Fees

 

Appendix 10: Annual Meeting Statistics: Registration Breakdown by Category

 


Appendix 11: Annual Meeting Statistics: Disposition of Financial Surplus

 


Appendix 12: Sample Budget for Annual General Meeting.

 

 




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