News Archive 2017

27 June 2017

ONE YEAR UNTIL RFG2018 KICKS OFF IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA!

The RFG countdown is on with over 200 proposed Sessions that have come in from around the globe providing a highly diverse program that will be delivered by geoscientists, industry professionals, students, educators, policy makers, and civil society.  The RFG 2018 looks very exciting and is rapidly coming together!

One of many highlights at the recently completed GAC-MAC 2017 conference in Kingston was a lecture by Ray Price, a renowned Canadian geologist, who has made numerous contributions to the understanding of the structure and tectonics of the North American Cordillera and produced extensive geological maps. Price’s lecture included an overview of the massive changes that occurred during his tenure at the Geological Survey of Canada, both in the effect of humans on planet Earth and in our understanding of fundamental Earth Sciences. 

While the global population ballooned in the second half of the 20th century, geologists were rapidly making huge advances in understanding the forces at play in the Earth; from the cycling of rock deep into the mantle, to movements of continents, to climate change and understanding what makes a habitable planet.  The history highlights how much we need geoscience, particularly with the anticipated population growth over the next 30 years that will undoubtedly stress all physical and social systems. 

Now is the time for Resources for Future Generations 2018—a conference anchored by Canadian and international leaders and innovators in all six key themes that will showcase advances in Earth Sciences, education, and innovation.

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25 May 2017

GAC®-MAC Kingston 2017 has officially ended with the memorable Field Trip through Newfoundland’s Appalachians pulling in to St. John’s yesterday. Thanks to the hard work of the local organizing committee – under the leadership of General Co-Chairs Kurt Kyser and Rob Rainbird, Program Chair Bob Dalrymple and Finance Chair Dan Layton-Matthews – it’s been a conference that exceeded expectations. Hundreds of speakers, volunteers, exhibitors, attendees, supporters, medallists and other award-winners gathered in Kingston’s Queen’s University to go “Back to where it began.” As with GAC’s previous meetings, you can find the abstracts on our website at gac.ca. Photos and details of the meeting will appear in the next issue of GEOLOG.

We hope to see you in Vancouver June 16-21, 2018, for the next GAC®-MAC within RFG: http://rfg2018.org.

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4 May 2017

It’s not too late to participate in the most important Canadian geoscience conference this year!

GAC-MAC 2017 pays tribute to 175 years of the Geological Survey of Canada, this country’s pre-eminent scientific agency, in the place where it all began: Kingston.

  • Enjoy presentations by such respected scientists as Roy Hyndman, Guy Narbonne, Ray Price, Daniel Lebel, Graham Young, and Robin Riddihough.
  • Discuss topics on such subjects as:
    • Contaminants in the Natural Environment
    • Climate Change in the Arctic
    • Geohazard Assessment and Engineering
    • Geometallurgy
    • Ancient and Modern Hydrothermal Processes
    • Development of Accretionary Orogens
    • Sedimentary Depositional Systems and Diagenesis
    • Outreach and Education Topics in Geo-science and Geo-engineering
    • Take in field trips, poster sessions, and social events.

It’s all happening May 14-18 in Kingston at GAC-MAC 2017: http://www.kingstongacmac.ca.

Register on site at Queen’s University starting May 14, 2017. We’ll see you there!

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May 02, 2017

Have you registered for GAC-MAC 2017 in Kingston? Don’t miss out on some of the best sessions and talks you’ll hear this year! Register today!

Attached is the first issue of GEOLOG for 2017. In this issue:

-         Planes, trains, and universities…a travel log from Hutchison Medallist Steve Piercey

-         AGS Colloquium and AGM wrap

-         Ground-Level view from the President

-         National Medallists, and Logan Student Prize winners

-         GAC Student Photo Contest winners

-          …and much more!

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April 27, 2017

The Earth

A major goal of RFG2018 is to tell the story of Earth—how Earth has changed over 4.5 billion years, and why we have resources—energy, minerals and water. These natural resources are vital for human life and prosperity, but the impacts of exploitation must be mitigated.

To address these challenges, we need to understand the Earth—our remarkable blue planet that teems with life. This is not easy. Earth’s defining system includes the atmosphere and climate, extensive oceans, active plate tectonics, and abundant life—and continuous interaction among all of these. Earth also provides resources that have supported human development for over ten thousand years.








Earth scientists need to tell this story and address these questions. RFG2018 will provide an unprecedented opportunity to do this and to communicate the results to the public.

Contribute your vision for the future of geoscience, environmental science and engineering, and sustainable solutions.
Deadline to submit a session: May 1, 2017

The Call for Short Courses and Field Trip are open. Please download guidelines before submitting your proposals. Deadline to submit your proposal: August 15, 2017

RFG2018 will host the annual Geological Association of Canada and Mineralogical Association of Canada (GAC-MAC) meeting. GAC-MAC sessions will examine aspects of the Earth and we invite others to propose sessions for RFG2018 that will help us to fully explore the context—in the broadest sense—for resources and their effective exploitation.

Learn more about RFG2018

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April 25, 2017

Honour the incredible people who shape Canada’s geoscience past, present and future. Join us at GAC-MAC 2017 in Kingston as we pay tribute to Logan Medallist Roy Hyndman, Hutchison Medallist Christie Rowe, Neale Medallist Guy Narbonne, and Ambrose Medallist Stephen Johnston. Plus, enjoy lectures reflecting on the 175th anniversary of the Geological Survey of Canada, field trips through fabulous and diverse landscapes, poster and technical sessions with established and emerging scientists, and social events creating lifelong memories. All at GAC-MAC 2017 in Kingston.

Don’t delay in registering! The April 30 Online Early Registration deadline (with great discounts) is fast approaching. Register now: www.kingstongacmac.ca

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April 11, 2017

Get Social!

One of the best things about being an Earth Scientist is forging rock-solid friendships at great conferences like GAC-MAC 2017 in Kingston. When you register for the conference, be sure to add on social events like the Vineyard tour, the GAC Luncheon (where we honour the best in Canadian Geoscience), and the Haunted Tour of Kingston. It’s all happening at GAC-MAC 2017 in May. Online registration deadline is April 30, 2017.

Register today at www.kingstongacmac.ca.

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April 06, 2017

Get out into the field with GAC-MAC 2017. Geological field trips for conference registrants include the Grenville Orogen, Upper New York State, Newfoundland’s Appalachians, the Lake Ontario Basin…and even around the ‘limestone city’ of Kingston itself next month. But you have a limited time to register, and most trips have a cap on the number of participants! Don’t miss out! Sign up for these trips when you register for GAC-MAC 2017 by April 24. For more information and to register, see www.kingstongacmac.ca.

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April 04, 2017

Have you registered for GAC-MAC 2017 in Kingston, Ontario?  Join your colleagues May 14-18 in celebrating the 175th anniversary of the founding of the Geological Survey of Canada, while sharing in the best Canadian earth science program this year. Sit in on Sessions, join a Field Trip, check out great posters, or take in a Short Course, all as part of the 2017 GAC-MAC. Accommodations on host Queen’s University campus are guaranteed available if booked by April 12, while blocks of hotel accommodations off campus have also been reserved.

Register now at www.kingstongacmac.ca.

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March 22, 2017

Call for Sessions: GAC-MAC 2018 Vancouver (RFG2018)

http://www.rfg2018.org/

In 2018, GAC®-MAC will be held in Vancouver BC, June 16-21st as part of the IUGS- and CFES-sponsored Resources for Future Generations (RFG 2018). This is a reminder that the deadline to submit a Session proposal closes May 1st 2017. We encourage you to submit under the “Earth” theme, which is intended to offer the typically rich and broad thematic range of GAC symposiums and technical sessions. Please contribute in making this another highly successful Annual Meeting!

For more on this landmark conference, see the RFG Newsletter at:

http://eepurl.com/cB1W9L

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March 17, 2017

Dear Voting Members

The annual meeting is approaching and several items of the Association business need your attention.  If you are unable to attend the meeting to be held on Monday, May 15, 2017,  from 15:40 – 16:40 in Room 106 Kinesiology, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON  please complete a Proxy form.  By logging onto our website i.e. www.gac.ca and clicking on Annual Business Meeting, you will see the Notice of the Annual Business meeting, the Slate of Officers, the Proxy form, and the Audited Financial Statement for 2016.

You will need your Username and Password to access all of the documents.  If you do not have that information at hand, you can email Eleanor at empenney@mun.ca or call her at 709-864-7660 and she will help you.

Don’t forget to send in your proxy form if you can’t attend!

See you in Kingston!

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March 08, 2017

Join us in Kingston!  The annual GAC®-MAC conference lands in beautiful Kingston, Ontario from May 14 to 18.  Registration is now open and we invite you to be part of the historic event.

Register now at http://gac.esd.mun.ca/GAC_2017/start.asp


If you haven’t renewed your membership, now is the perfect time.   Renew now and take advantage of a reduced registration fee! www.gac.ca

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March 02, 2017

More time? That’s right! You now have more time to submit your abstract to the Kingston GAC®-MAC meeting being held May 14-18, 2017. Celebrate 175 years of great science with the Geological Survey of Canada and your colleagues and friends. It’s the premiere geoscience conference in Canada, and you should be part of it. Abstract deadline now extended to March 6, 2017. Submit your abstract now at http://www.kingstongacmac.ca

Looking for something good to read? Remember you save 45% off the Retail book prices at www.gac.ca/bookstore, plus as a member of GAC you can save on books from GSA and the Geological Society (London). If you haven’t renewed your membership, now is the perfect time! www.gac.ca

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February 28, 2017

The countdown is on. Just hours remain in the deadline for Abstract submissions to be received for the 2017 GAC-MAC in Kingston, ON. Don’t miss this opportunity to present your work at this landmark conference, which honours the 175th anniversary of the founding of the Geological Survey of Canada in 1842. Submit your abstract now at www.kingstongacmac.ca

Looking to save money on your registration at GAC-MAC 2017 (or at any national conference for GSA, Geological Society (London) or AGU)? Renew your GAC membership! That’s right: Members save on conference registration, books, and more. Renew today at www.gac.ca.

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February 23, 2017

Less than one week remains in the deadline to submit your Abstract for the 2017 GAC-MAC in Kingston, ON. To be considered for this landmark meeting, your abstract must be submitted by Tuesday, February 28. For details – and to submit your Abstract – see the annual meeting website at www.kingstongacmac.ca

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Have you renewed your GAC membership? Do it and $ave on your conference registration at GAC-MAC Kingston, as well as at annual conferences for AGU, GSA and The Geological Society (London). www.gac.ca

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February 21, 2017

Beat the rush! The abstract submission deadline for the 2017 GAC-MAC in beautiful Kingston is in ONE WEEK! That’s right: Your abstract must be submitted by Tuesday, February 28. This meeting coincides with the 175th anniversary of the founding of the GSC in Kingston, so we are bringing it Back Where it Began. Submit your Abstract at www.kingstongacmac.ca

Have you got something to say? Tell the earth science world through GEOLOG. Articles and photos are welcome! Deadline for the next issue is March 1, 2017.

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February 09, 2017

Do you know a student member of GAC with some mad photography skills? GAC is delighted to announce the second annual Student Photography Contest, with prizes and bragging rights to the three top winners. We’re looking for landscape photographs displaying Canada’s varied scenery from a geological perspective, or geological photographs showcasing spectacular geological features (e.g. outcrops, fossils, thin sections, minerals). Students: Have you got the shots? Send them to GAC. Full contest details at http://www.gac.ca/wp/?page_id=12365

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We’re going Back to Where it Began: Kingston, Ontario. GAC-MAC 2017 is now accepting Abstract submissions until February 28, 2017. Get your abstract in before it’s too late! http://www.kingstongacmac.ca/en/

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February 01, 2017

In 2018, GAC®-MAC will be held in Vancouver BC, June 16-21st as part of the IUGS- and CFES-sponsored Resources for Future Generations (RFG 2018). We hope to have a strong presence of the Canadian geological community and encourage you to submit session proposals as you would normally do at GAC®-MAC. Although RFG has a resource-based focus, we hope to also attract core geosciences that are not uniquely tied to resources. The more international scope of RFG will be a great opportunity to showcase GAC-MAC, the GAC and your science. The call for proposal is currently opened through the end of March 2017 but you are encouraged to submit early. For more information please visit the web site http://www.rfg2018.org/

Have your friends joined GAC? Remind them they get special discounts on national conference registration and books through GAC, GSA, AGU and the Geological Society (London)! Encourage a friend to JOIN GAC today!

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January 26, 217

Get Resourceful: Empower our Nation! Submit your session idea for RFG 2018 – our annual GAC®-MAC scientific conference. We need your session ideas in one of these themes: energy, minerals, water, the earth, and resources and society. Submit your idea today: rfg2018.com and be sure to tag it as a GAC session!

And remember: GAC Members get special discounts on registration for national conferences for GAC, GSA, AGU and the Geological Society (London)! Encourage a friend to JOIN GAC today!

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January 26, 2017

We are pleased to announce that the final issue of Volume 43 of Geoscience Canada is now available, and was ‘officially’ published at the end of December, 2016.

Issue 4 of 2016 contains a varied selection of articles including discussion of the role of the Yellowstone plume in Cordilleran tectonics, flood basalts in the high Himalaya, and the as-yet untapped wine potential of Wisconsin.

There are also some commentaries on the 50th anniversary of the Wilson Cycle, a book review and previews of exciting field trips for Kingston 2017.

Not to mention the GAC presidential address for 2016! We are now working on the first issue of 2017, which will be similarly diverse. Stay tuned.

The table of contents can be found on our website: www.geosciencecanada.ca/geocan_current.htm Full content of articles that are not open access is available at the UNB content website, after logging in: https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/GC

Subscriptions to the journal are available through the Geological Association of Canada (GAC) at www.gac.ca

Thanks to all our readers for the continuing interest in our work.

Andrew Kerr
Scientific Editor
akerr@mun.ca

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January 24, 2017

The latest issue of your GAC quarterly newsletter – GEOLOG – is available for free download anytime.

GEOLOG informs members about current events and happenings in earth sciences in Canada and affecting Canadians. It’s a venue for Association news, including activities of our Sections and Divisions.

If you have something you’d like to share – photos, news, a review of activity – please send it to the GEOLOG editor Alwynne.Beaudoin@gov.ab.ca with ‘GEOLOG’ in your subject line.

AND: If you haven’t renewed your membership, you can do it anytime online at www.gac.ca. Remember: GAC Members get member discounts on publications and conference registration from GAC, GSA, AGU and Geological Society (London)!

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January 19, 2017

The Canadian Geological Foundation (CGF) invites proposals for the next round of grants selection. The Foundation is dedicated to assist in the development of geological sciences in Canada. Grants are made to support activities of national interest and broad significance, with emphasis on those of long-term importance. The Foundation disburses more than $175,000 annually, paid upon completion of the project.

Application forms and detailed instructions are available on the CGF website at www.canadiangeologicalfoundation.org.  Submission deadline is March 31, 2017.

Queries about the Canadian Geological Foundation should be addressed to the Secretary:

Jane Wynne Tel: (250)-656-6681    Email: jane.wynne@shaw.ca

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January 17, 2017

It is with sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. David W. Strangway, president of GAC 1978-79, GAC Council Member 1975-80, Logan Medallist 1984, Distinguished Fellow and Distinguished Member in 1995. Among his other career highlights: Dr. Strangway was the only person to be president of both the University of British Columbia and the University of Toronto; he was Chief of the geophysics branch of NASA in the 1970s; and he was founding President of Quest University.

For obituaries highlighting the life and career of Dr. David Strangway, please see:
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/former-ubc-president-david-strangway-dies/article33322319/
and
http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/former-ubc-president-david-strangway-dead-at-82

Dr. Strangway’s own website also provides insight into the former GAC president: http://davidstrangway.com/index.html

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January 06, 2017

It is with sadness that we announce the passing of Dr. Atholl Sutherland Brown, president of GAC 1979-80, GAC Council Member 1976-1981, Chair of GAC-MAC Victoria 1983, J. Willis Ambrose Medallist 1987, Distinguished Fellow and Distinguished Member in 1995, 50-Year Member in 2010, and author of the 2013 autobiography “Searching for the Origins of Haida Gwaii:  Adventures While Mapping the Geology of the Islands 1958-1962”.

A celebration of his life will be held at UVic’s Interfaith Chapel on January 19 at 12:30 pm, with reception to follow at Victoria Golf Club.

For obituaries highlighting the life and career of Atholl Sutherland Brown, please see:

http://www.timescolonist.com/news/local/obituary-atholl-sutherland-brown-from-fighter-pilot-to-b-c-s-chief-geologist-1.4487120

and

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/timescolonist/obituary.aspx?pid=183122979

RFG2018: Your Content Quarterly (2nd Edition)

 

 

ONE YEAR UNTIL RFG2018 KICKS OFF IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA!

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The RFG countdown is on with over 200 proposed Sessions that have come in from around the globe providing a highly diverse program that will be delivered by geoscientists, industry professionals, students, educators, policy makers, and civil society.  The RFG 2018 looks very exciting and is rapidly coming together!

One of many highlights at the recently completed GAC-MAC 2017 conference in Kingston was a lecture by Ray Price, a renowned Canadian geologist, who has made numerous contributions to the understanding of the structure and tectonics of the North American Cordillera and produced extensive geological maps. Price’s lecture included an overview of the massive changes that occurred during his tenure at the Geological Survey of Canada, both in the effect of humans on planet Earth and in our understanding of fundamental Earth Sciences.

While the global population ballooned in the second half of the 20th century, geologists were rapidly making huge advances in understanding the forces at play in the Earth; from the cycling of rock deep into the mantle, to movements of continents, to climate change and understanding what makes a habitable planet.  The history highlights how much we need geoscience, particularly with the anticipated population growth over the next 30 years that will undoubtedly stress all physical and social systems.

Now is the time for Resources for Future Generations 2018—a conference anchored by Canadian and international leaders and innovators in all six key themes that will showcase advances in Earth Sciences, education, and innovation.

 

 

 

THE EARTH

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Fundamental geoscience informs our everyday life. Each rock tells a story and the rock record is the world’s biggest hard drive—requiring those skilled in reading it to extract the information needed by humanity.   From volcanic eruptions to earthquakes and landslides, geology helps us navigate the hazards of living on an active planet.  Sources of energy, minerals, and metals needed for society and human health are distributed in variable ways throughout the Earth’s crust and concentrated by numerous processes.  Keys to understanding how to find and develop resources lie in the fundamentals of understanding the Earth.  Groundwater resources are governed by many factors including sub-surface geology, basin development, and watershed geography—in addition to human use.  For all these reasons and more, RFG2018 will be ‘grounded in geoscience’ and will play host to GAC-MAC 2018.

 

 

MAPPING: THE ARCTIC

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Mapping is the primary basis for our understanding of the Earth and Canada’s Arctic regions, which are rich in geologic history. Over four billion years of the Earth’s history are represented in the Arctic and Canadian researchers are at the forefront of exploring and understanding the clues to the dynamic history that is encapsulated in the rock record.  The perspective and wealth of information provided by the international “Geological Map of the Arctic” and the innovative queriable database assembled by Marc St-Onge and his colleagues, demonstrates that new national and global syntheses and knowledge are fundamental to understanding the history and evolution of the Earth.

 

Marc St-Onge, is Senior Research Scientist and Head of Regional Geology at the Geological Survey of Canada, Natural Resources Canada. His innovative work led to the publication of the “Geological Map of the Arctic” in 2011 and the “Tectonic Map of Arctic Canada” in 2015.  Marc has now surpassed the milestone of 100 published maps, a fundamental and unprecedented contribution to our geoscience knowledge base.

 

Marc St-Onge - in Karrat Fiord, Greenland

“In 1999, the oldest known terrestrial rock on Earth discovered by Marc St-Onge and his students in 1983, was dated at 4.031 ± 0.003 billion years.  It is part of the Acasta Gneiss of the western Slave craton in northwestern Canada, with the type area located ca. 300 km NNW of Yellowknife.”

 

 

 

 

SESSION SAMPLES

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The Earth

  • Fault and shear zone processes across space and time
  • Innovations in dating the evolution of earth, resources, and planetary crusts
  • Convergent margin geohazards and geodisasters: present understanding, mitigation, and long and short term preparedness
  • Applications of geoscience for environmental assessment techniques

Minerals

  • Mining for clean energy: the role of minerals and metals in the clean energy transition
  • Zinc-lead-silver forming systems
  • Ore fertility indicators: fingerprinting magmatic processes to evaluate resource formation.
  • Mineralogy: emerging and current technologies—how small can we go?

 

Energy

  • Global shale:  resources, economics, and environmental challenges
  • Geothermal exploration of foreland basin reservoirs
  • Global uranium deposits: from exploration to remediation

Water

  • 21st century global freshwater security: can it exist and can scientists communicate the challenge?
  • Groundwater and unconventional oil and gas resource development
  • Mining water policy and stewardship in the developing context

 

Resources and Society

  • Geoethics in georisks management for a safer and more resilient society
  • Resources and sustainability: dialogue, design, and developing differently
  • Public reporting on natural resources:  a key geoscience contribution to future generations

Knowledge and Education

  • Indigenous perspectives in education
  • Mentorship and transferring knowledge to the next generation of geoscientists and geoscience educators
  • New horizons in earth science education research

 

 

 

 

PARTNERS IN THE FIELD

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Technical partner NRCan (Natural Resources Canada) initiated an ambitious and innovative program in 2008—Geo-mapping for Energy and Minerals (GEM)—with the goal of mapping large areas of Canada’s North.  The program, now extended to 2020 as GEM-2, has covered regions in all areas of Canada’s north, involving geoscientists and indigenous peoples in documenting, mapping and understanding the geology of the Arctic.

 

The Challenge
Ultimately the aim is to unlock the full mineral and energy potential of the North and to promote responsible land development in the region.  While supporting increased exploration of natural resources, the work is critical to informing decisions on land use that balance conservation and sustainable resource development.

Collaboration is Key
The program benefits from an Advisory Group of Northerners, which includes representatives from territorial governments, the private sector, and Aboriginal socio-economic development organizations.  Partnerships with the provinces and territories are critical to the effort, while Universities across Canada engage in specific research projects.  Colleges and indigenous peoples work together to incorporate traditional knowledge and to train communities in the use of new technologies vital for the understanding of the landscape of the North.

 

 

 

Find out more about

 

 

 

Project Study—GEM2


Tectonothermal characterization of the Aishihik Lake Region, West-Central Yukon Territory

Research: Dr. Dan Gibson—Chair of Field Trips for RFG2018—from Simon Fraser University, is lead on this project in the Cordillera; working to further the understanding of the metallogeny, thermochronology,  tectonothermal evolution and crustal architecture of northern Canada.  The current lack of geological data in the West-central Yukon has significantly curtailed exploration. This work will attempt to unravel the complex history of the Aishihik Lake region and assess the influence that Cordilleran tectonism had on preconditioning the crust for gold mineralization.

 

 

Outcomes: The project will foster a network of Canadian research scientists involving student-led investigations, producing data bases, and scientific reports and publications.  It is anticipated the results will be incorporated into mineral exploration strategies, provide important information for assessing mineralization potential, which will help decrease the exploration risks in this region.  In addition, the data could also be used by local communities and governments for land use decision-making.

 

 

RFG2018 GEMS

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Holly Steenkamp is the Mary-Claire Ward Geoscience Award winner for 2016 and a true GEM!

Holly is a student at Université Laval and a Regional Mapping Geoscientist with the Canada Nunavut Geoscience Office, and won for the field work associated with her ongoing PhD thesis: “A tectonometamorphic history of the Tehery Lake–Wager Bay area, northwestern Hudson’s Bay, Nunavut”.  GAC notice of Award The recent GAC-MAC meeting in Kingston allowed time for a conversation with Holly about her career choices and experience working in Arctic Canada.

 

 

Holly Steenkamp

Holly Steenkamp’s enthusiasm and passion for geology is evident from the first meeting.  She discovered geology in high school through a Geography 12 course that introduced her to the dynamic earth.  Around the same time, she was facing the common dilemma of what to study at University.  Geology fit the bill, combining science and math, and learning how plate tectonics, volcanoes, and earthquakes all worked.  At the University of Victoria, summer field mapping was encouraged as experience needed for future employment.  In Steenkamp’s case it led to positions as assistant to Master’s students and a summer with the British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines in Cranbrook.  She graduated just in time for the stock market ‘crash’ of 2008 and an uncertain job market.

In a classic case of coincidence in luck and timing with other events, she opted to go back to school, accepting a Master’s degree program at Dalhousie in Halifax, Nova Scotia.  With no job for the summer, an epic road trip was in order.  She drove across country and was just short of her destination when she received a call for summer work after all:  ‘Hey do you want to come work in Alaska?” Five days later she was back on the west coast, logging core for six weeks with a mineral exploration company.

She completed her Master’s program and yet another decision point loomed.  This time a mentor, an instructor at Dalhousie, told her about a position at the Canada-Nunavut Geoscience Office and provided critical coaching in the application process.  She got the job and took it quickly, worried that without another degree, opportunities might be limited.

 

 

Since 2013, Steenkamp has co-led three regional mapping projects and mapped three carving stone deposits in Nunavut with the Canada-Nunavut Geoscience Office. Her current project, covering the Tehery Lake–Wager Bay area, is a joint campaign with the GSC, and was defined as a priority area at the end of the last GEM round.  The CNGO-GSC partnership allows for sharing of northern boots on the ground experience in local communities with the scientific expertise of the GSC.  When it was determined that graduate students were going to be important to the work, Steenkamp’s manager suggested that she get involved in the scientific side of the project as well.

Steenkamp’s job involved the permitting, planning, hiring of summer students, and participating in the field mapping; finding answers to the deeper scientific questions in the Tehery Lake–Wager Bay area is the PhD.  Bears, bull muskox, wolves, and alarms in helicopters all became part of her experience.  With two field seasons now under her belt and one more to go, Steenkamp is becoming an expert at addressing large-scale mapping problems while working in teams, collaborating with diverse groups, individuals, and institutions.

The mapping process itself involves multiple components of defining map areas, using a range of scientific tools, and archived materials, as well as incorporating valuable traditional knowledge from the community.  There is a strong relationship between community and geoscience.

 

 

The overall impact of these programs for communities is not just about finding resources, it’s also about changes to permafrost, building new infrastructure, and increasing awareness of geoscience in Nunavut for future generations.

Besides mapping 45,000km² of Arctic Canada, Steenkamp finds time for numerous adventurous and (naturally) geo-focused trips to places such as Norway, Iceland, Italy, BC, Haida Gwaii, the Yukon, and the NWT.  What’s next on the list?  Keep an eye out for Holly Steenkamp on an outcrop near you!


 

 

 

TOP #RFG2018 INFLUENCERS

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EDITOR’S PICK

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Recommendations for good reads related to supplying Resources for Future Generations – books that inspire discussion, new ideas and solutions for a better world.

 

The Story of Earth: The First 4.5 Billion Years, from Stardust to Living Planet
by Robert Hazen (2012)

“Hailed by The New York Times for writing “with wonderful clarity about science . . . that effortlessly teaches as it zips along,” nationally bestselling author Robert M. Hazen offers a radical new approach to Earth history in this intertwined tale of the planet’s living and nonliving spheres. With an astrobiologist’s imagination, a historian’s perspective, and a naturalist’s eye, Hazen calls upon twenty-first-century discoveries that have revolutionized geology and enabled scientists to envision Earth’s many iterations in vivid detail—from the mile-high lava tides of its infancy to the early organisms responsible for more than two-thirds of the mineral varieties beneath our feet. Lucid, controversial, and on the cutting edge of its field, The Story of Earth is popular science of the highest order.”  - Barnes and Noble

 

 

Anne JB Thompson @Thompson_AJB
Geoscientist, supporting Resources for Future Generations  #RFG2018,
Editor  @RFG2018, Councilor  @SocietyEconGeol

 

 

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